African Journal of Agricultural Research
Subscribe to AJAR
Full Name*
Email Address*

Article Number - 1B1809062221


Vol.12(1), pp. 1-5 , January 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJAR2016.11947
ISSN: 1991-637X



Full Length Research Paper

Relative forage preference by camel (Camelus dromedarius) as influenced by season, sex and age in the Sahel zone of north western Nigeria



Alkali, H. A.
  • Alkali, H. A.
  • Department of Animal Science, Federal University, Kashere, P.M.B. 0182, Gombe State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Muhammad B. F.
  • Muhammad B. F.
  • Federal College of Education (Technical), Bichi, Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Njidda, A. A.
  • Njidda, A. A.
  • Department of Animal Science, Federal University, Kashere, P.M.B. 0182, Gombe State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Abubakar, M.
  • Abubakar, M.
  • Animal Production Program, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Bauchi State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Ghude, M. I.
  • Ghude, M. I.
  • Veterinary Section, Nassarawa Local Government Council, Kano State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 13 November 2016  Accepted: 14 December 2016  Published: 05 January 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


A study on effect of age, sex and seasonal variation in forage preference of camel was conducted in the Sudano-Sahelian zone of north western Nigeria. A total number of 12 camels were used in the study. Data were collected at an interval of 5 min for each category of animal for 3 consecutive days in dry and rainy seasons using scan sampling method. Based on the observation, the number of plants preferred in this study by young camel calves was less than that preferred by matured camel. Matured animals consume mostly diversified, thorny and taller plant species which might not be easily accessed by the camel calves. Leptadania hastata was found to be the most preferred forage during the rainy season, while Ziziphus mauritiana was the preferred forage during dry season with mean feeding time of 87.33 and 46.66 min/day, respectively; while the least preferred forage during the rainy and dry seasons were Acacia sieberiana and Bauhinia rufescens with mean feeding time of 0.11 and 15.00 min/day, respectively. Browse species found in the study area are extremely important as feed for camels.

 

Key words: Camel, preference, forage, grazing.

Bleich VC, Bowyer RT, Wehausen JD (1997). Sexual Segregation in Mountain Sheep: Resources or Predation? Wildlife Monogr. 134:1-50.

 

Chimsa YY, Mummed M, Kurtu Y (2013). Forage Preference Of Camel Calves (Camelus Dromedarius) In Eastern Ethiopia. J. Anim. Plant Sci. 23(5):1236-1241.

 
 

Clutton TH, Albon SD, Guinness FE (1986). Great expectations: dominance, breeding success and offspring sex ratios in red deer. Anim. Behav. 34:460-471.
Crossref

 
 

Dereje M, Uden P (2005). The Browsing Dromedary Camel I. Behaviour, Plant Preference and Quality of Forage Selected. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol.121:297-308.
Crossref

 
 

Guevara JC, Stasi CR, Estevez OR (1996). Seasonal Specific Selectivity by Cattle on Rangeland in Monte Desert of Mendoza, Argentina. J. Arid Environ. 34:125-132.
Crossref

 
 

Illius AW, Gordon IJ (1992). Modelling the nutritional ecology of ungulate herbivores: evolution of body size and competitive interactions. Oecologia 89:428-434.
Crossref

 
 

Iason GR, Duck CD, Clutton-Brock TH (1986). Grazing and reproductive success of red deer: the effect of local enrichment by gull colonies. J. Anim. Ecol. 55:507-515.
Crossref

 
 

Kalla DJU, Zahraddeen D, Yerima J (2008). Reproductive Performance of One Humped Camel at the Komodugu-Yobe River Basin, Nigeria. WBC/ICAR Satelite Meeting on Camelid Reproduction pp. 77-81.

 
 

Kassily FN (2002). Forage Quality and Camel Feeding Patterns in Central Boringo, Kenya. Livest. Production Sci. 78:175-182.
Crossref

 
 

Main M, Weckerly F, Vernon C (1996). Sexual segregation in ungulates: new directions for research. J. Mammal. 77:449-461.
Crossref

 
 

Mengli Z, Walters DW, Jin Y (2006). Bactrian Camel Foraging Behaviour in Haloxylon ammeodendron Desert of inner Mongolia. Appl. Anim. Behav. 99:330-343.
Crossref

 
 

Mohammed I, Hoffmann I (2006). Management of Drought Camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Crop-livestock Production System in North West – Nigeria. Livest. Res. Rural Dev. 17:12.

 
 

Muhammed A (2013). Place of Biodiversity in Ecosystems' Efficiency In Nigeria. British J. Earth Sci. Res. 1(1):10-17.

 
 

Mukasa-Mugerwa E (1981). The Camel (Camelus dromedaries): A Bibliographical Review. ILCA Monograph 5. International Livestock Centre for Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

 
 

Njidda AA, Olatunji EA, Raji AY (2012). Semi arid browse forages: Their antinutritive substances and in sacco neutral detergent fibre and organic matter degradability. J. Agric. Vet. Sci. 1(6):31-36.
Crossref

 
 

Ouedraogo-Kone S, Kabore-Zoungrana CY, Ledin I (2006). Important Characteristics of Some Browse Species in an Agrosilvopastoral System in West Africa. Agroforestry Syst. 74:213-221.
Crossref

 
 

Rutagwenda T (1985). The control of important camel diseases in the integrated Project of Arid Lands Study area. Camel disease and Productivity in the arid lands of Northern Kenya. Integrated Project in the Arid Lands (IPAL) technical Report No. E-7, Germany pp. 9-70.

 
 

Schwartz HJ (1992). Common range forage species preferred by Camels and their nutritive value. In The One-Humped Camel in Eastern Africa: A pictorial guide to diseases, health care and management. Verlag Josef Margraf, Germany.

 
 

Smith OB, Idowu OA, Odunlami O (1991). Comparetive Rumen Degradability of Forages, Browse, Crop Residues and Agricultural by-products. Livest. Res. Rural Dev. 3(2):1011-1017.

 
 

Towhidi A. (2007). Nutritive value of some herbage for dromedary Camel in Iran. Pak. J. Biol. Sci. 10(1):167-170.
Crossref

 
 

Umaru MA, Bello A (2013). Reproduction in the One Humped Camel (Camelus dromedarius) in Semi Arid Nigeria. S. J. 2(1):1-7.

 
 

Van Soest PJ (1994). Nutritional Ecology of Ruminants. Cornell University Press ltd 476 p.

 
 

Villaret JC, Bon R (1995). Social and spatial segregation in alpine ibex (Capra ibex) in Bargy, French Alps. Ethol. 101:291-300.

 
 

Wei D (1979). Chinese camels and their productivities. In Proc. Workshop on Camels and their Productivities 18-20 December, Khartoum, Sudan.

 
 

Zhao M, Walter WD, Guodong H, Jin Y (2006). Bactrian camel Foraging Behaviour in Haloxy Ammodendron Desert of Inner Mongolia. Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci. 99:330-343.
Crossref

 

 


APA Alkali, H. A., Muhammad, B. F., Njidda, A. A., Abubakar, M., & Ghude, M. I. (2017). Relative forage preference by camel (Camelus dromedarius) as influenced by season, sex and age in the Sahel zone of north western Nigeria. African Journal of Agricultural Research, 12(1), 1-5.
Chicago Alkali, H. A., Muhammad B. F., Njidda, A. A., Abubakar, M. and Ghude, M. I.. "Relative forage preference by camel (Camelus dromedarius) as influenced by season, sex and age in the Sahel zone of north western Nigeria." African Journal of Agricultural Research 12, no. 1 (2017): 1-5.
MLA Alkali, et al. "Relative forage preference by camel (Camelus dromedarius) as influenced by season, sex and age in the Sahel zone of north western Nigeria." African Journal of Agricultural Research 12.1 (2017): 1-5.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJAR2016.11947
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJAR/article-abstract/1B1809062221

Subscription Form