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Article Number - 2E47A6C55601


Vol.12(2), pp. 91-95 , February 2018
https://doi.org/10.5897/AJEST2017.2446
ISSN: 1996-0786


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Full Length Research Paper

Production of biogas by the co-digestion of cow dung and crop residue at University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan



Sidra Ijaz Khan
  • Sidra Ijaz Khan
  • Department of Engineering, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan.
  • Google Scholar
Shehrbno Aftab
  • Shehrbno Aftab
  • Department of Engineering, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan.
  • Google Scholar
Tamour Abid Chaudhry
  • Tamour Abid Chaudhry
  • Department of Engineering, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan.
  • Google Scholar
Muhammad Noman Younis
  • Muhammad Noman Younis
  • Department of Engineering, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 29 October 2017  Accepted: 14 November 2017  Published: 28 February 2018

Copyright © 2018 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Anaerobic co-digestion is one of the most promising auxiliaries for treating waste because of the high energy redemption. Bio-digester is designed and apparatus installed for anaerobic co-digestion of cow waste with crop residue in order to manufacture biogas. Gas production is measured by using water displacement method. The experimental results show that 1 kg of cow dung can produce about 15 to 30 L of biogas per day. By the addition of wheat straw, it yielded 20 to 60 L per day of gas. Bio-digester slurry consists of a blend of cow dung, crop residue, and inoculum in the ratio of 50:30:20 (50 kg cow dung: 30 kg wheat straw: 20 kg inoculums) by weight. Experimental analysis for measuring the different parameters affecting the processes like chemical oxygen demand, temperature and pH levels was carried out. Semi-flow through process was applied throughout the process of production in order to manage feedstock and effluent. The University of the Punjab annually produces 1670 kg/acre of crop residue and 1946 kg/day of cow dung, whereas, the total crop produce is 4130 kg/acre/annum. The result shows that by effectively utilizing the crop residue which is available seasonally as 20 to 60 L of bio gas yield per day, this can provide methane gas to laboratories of Punjab University.
 
Key words: Bio-digester, anaerobic, co-digestion.

Abbreviation:

GDP, Gross development production; CO, carbon monoxide; NO, nitrogen oxide; SO2, Sulphur dioxide; COD, chemical oxygen demand; BOD, Biological oxygen demand; pH, potential hydrogen; ASTM, American Society for Testing and Materials.


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APA Khan, S. I., Aftab, S., Chaudhry, T. A., & Younis, M. N. (2018). Production of biogas by the co-digestion of cow dung and crop residue at University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan. African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology , 12(2), 91-95.
Chicago Sidra Ijaz Khan, Shehrbno Aftab, Tamour Abid Chaudhry and Muhammad Noman Younis. "Production of biogas by the co-digestion of cow dung and crop residue at University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan." African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology 12, no. 2 (2018): 91-95.
MLA Sidra Ijaz Khan, et al. "Production of biogas by the co-digestion of cow dung and crop residue at University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan." African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology 12.2 (2018): 91-95.
   
DOI https://doi.org/10.5897/AJEST2017.2446
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJEST/article-abstract/2E47A6C55601

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