African Journal of
Food Science

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Food Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0794
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJFS
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 766

Full Length Research Paper

Assessment of entomophagy in Abidjan (Cote D’ivoire, West Africa)

G. P. EHOUNOU
  • G. P. EHOUNOU
  • Laboratory of Zoology and Animal Biology, UFR (Faculty) of Biosciences, University FélixHouphouët-Boigny, 22 BP 582 Abidjan 22, Côte d’Ivoire.
  • Google Scholar
S. W. M. OUALI-N’GORAN
  • S. W. M. OUALI-N’GORAN
  • Laboratory of Zoology and Animal Biology, UFR (Faculty) of Biosciences, University FélixHouphouët-Boigny, 22 BP 582 Abidjan 22, Côte d’Ivoire.
  • Google Scholar
S. NIASSY
  • S. NIASSY
  • ICIPE - African Insect Science for Food and Health,Nairobi, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 03 September 2017
  •  Accepted: 28 November 2017
  •  Published: 31 January 2018

Abstract

In order to assess the contribution of edible insects to the efforts for combatting food insecurity and poverty in Côte d’Ivoire, a survey aimed at identifying edible insects in Côte d’Ivoire was conducted from August 2014 to August 2015 in three communes in the city of Abidjan (Abobo, Adjamé and Yopougon). Four hundred and seventy-two people were interviewed at random. The results revealed that 59.72% of the respondents consume insects against 40.27% who do not consume them. This study has helped to identify nine edible insect species belonging to eight families and five orders. The species Imbrasia oyemensis (Lepidoptera, Satunidae) and Macrotermes subhylinus (Isoptera, Macrotermitidae) are widely consumed due to their availability in markets. The species Rhyncophorus phoenicis (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) or palm tree caterpillar is one of the most prized by 40% of the surveyed population. The statistical analyses applied to the 365 people surveyed revealed that insect consumption is a function of the cultural area (X²=76.7; ddl= 4, p < 0.05) and the age ((X²=54.88, ddl=3; p < 0.05) of the consumers. In economic terms, insect trade remains a significant source of income in households having an average income estimated at 58,666.66±11216 FCFA per seller and per month. However, their availability in markets is seasonal. A mastery of the biology of these insects could ensure their permanent availability in markets.

Key words: Edible insects, Abidjan, motivations, age, region, consumers.