African Journal of Food Science
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Article Number - E3C45B662071


Vol.11(1), pp. 1-11 , January 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJFS2016.1516
ISSN: 1996-0794



Review

Spontaneously fermented kenyan milk products: A review of the current state and future perspectives



John Masani Nduko*
  • John Masani Nduko*
  • Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, P. O. Box 536-20115, Egerton, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar
Joseph W. Matofari
  • Joseph W. Matofari
  • Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, P. O. Box 536-20115, Egerton, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar
Zacchaeus Okoth Nandi
  • Zacchaeus Okoth Nandi
  • Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, P. O. Box 536-20115, Egerton, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar
Moses Barasa Sichangi
  • Moses Barasa Sichangi
  • Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, P. O. Box 536-20115, Egerton, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 15 September 2016  Accepted: 10 October 2016  Published: 31 January 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Many spontaneously fermented milk products are produced in Kenya, where they are integral to human diet and play a central role in enhancing food security and income generation. Some of these products have demonstrated therapeutic and probiotic effects although recent reports have linked some to death, biotoxin infections, and esophageal cancer. These products are mostly processed from poor quality raw materials under unhygienic conditions resulting to inconsistent product quality and limited shelf-lives. Though very popular, research on their processing technologies is low. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the most common spontaneously fermented milk products from Kenya including Mursik, Kule naoto, Amabere amaruranu and Suusa. Their production challenges and future perspectives are highlighted; emphasizing the need for application of high throughput biotechnologies in their study. Available literature on their microbiology, biochemistry, and chemical composition is summarized. Moreover, knowledge on the value of clean starting raw material, fermentation parameters definition, and employment of standard equipment are discussed.

Key words: Starter culture, probiotics, lactic acid bacteria, fermented milk, high throughput biotechnology, spontaneous fermentation, Kule naoto, Mursik, Amabere amaruranu

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APA Nduko, J. M., Matofari, J. W., Nandi, Z. O., & Sichangi, M. B. (2017). Spontaneously fermented kenyan milk products: A review of the current state and future perspectives. African Journal of Food Science, 11(1), 1-11.
Chicago John Masani Nduko, Joseph W. Matofari, Zacchaeus Okoth Nandi and Moses Barasa Sichangi. "Spontaneously fermented kenyan milk products: A review of the current state and future perspectives." African Journal of Food Science 11, no. 1 (2017): 1-11.
MLA John Masani Nduko, et al. "Spontaneously fermented kenyan milk products: A review of the current state and future perspectives." African Journal of Food Science 11.1 (2017): 1-11.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJFS2016.1516
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJFS/article-abstract/E3C45B662071

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