African Journal of Food Science
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Article Number - FB1617A62075


Vol.11(1), pp. 18-23 , January 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJFS2016.1487
ISSN: 1996-0794



Full Length Research Paper

Sensory quality of orange-fleshed sweetpotato cultivars as affected by curing and household-level storage methods



Richard A. Atuna
  • Richard A. Atuna
  • Department of Biotechnology, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Francis K. Amagloh*
  • Francis K. Amagloh*
  • Department of Food Science and Technology, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Edward E. Carey
  • Edward E. Carey
  • International Potato Center, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Jan W. Low
  • Jan W. Low
  • International Potato Center, Nairobi, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 11 June 2016  Accepted: 07 September 2016  Published: 31 January 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


A 2×2×3 factorial design was used to investigate the effect of two orange-fleshed sweetpotato cultivars, three curing treatments and two homestead storage methods on the general appearance, finger-feel firmness, sweetness and overall acceptability of boiled roots. The cultivars were Apomuden and Nane, and the two homestead storage methods were the sand box and the heap storage. In-ground curing (dehaulming) and field-piled curing, for seven days and then uncured treatment were the curing options investigated. A hedonic scale ranging from 1 = extremely dislike to 5 = like extremely was used. For cultivars, the sensory scores ranged from 3.20 to 3.84 (farming season I) and 3.32 to 3.93 (farming season II), indicating good consumer preference. Curing type significantly (p<0.05) influenced the sensory properties of roots in the second farming season. Storage type showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) in all sensory attributes in both farming seasons except for sweetness and the heap storage had significantly higher (3.84 vs. 3.47, p<0.0001; respectively) score relative to sand box in the first year. Apart from general appearance (3.64 vs. 3.32, p = 0.002) and finger-feel firmness (3.51 vs. 3.25; p = 0.006) in which females had a significantly higher score than males in the first farming season, all the other sensory attributes were similarly ranked by males and females for both years. In-ground and field-piled curing methods, there is increased consumer acceptability and it should be encouraged.

Key words: Curing, Field-piled, Gender, Sensory, in-ground, orange-fleshed sweetpotato.

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APA Atuna, R. A., Amagloh, F. K., Carey, E. E., & Low, J. W. (2017). Sensory quality of orange-fleshed sweetpotato cultivars as affected by curing and household-level storage methods. African Journal of Food Science, 11(1), 18-23.
Chicago Richard A. Atuna, Francis K. Amagloh, Edward E. Carey and Jan W. Low. "Sensory quality of orange-fleshed sweetpotato cultivars as affected by curing and household-level storage methods." African Journal of Food Science 11, no. 1 (2017): 18-23.
MLA Richard A. Atuna, et al. "Sensory quality of orange-fleshed sweetpotato cultivars as affected by curing and household-level storage methods." African Journal of Food Science 11.1 (2017): 18-23.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJFS2016.1487
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJFS/article-abstract/FB1617A62075

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