African Journal of History and Culture
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Article Number - 6FBF2C663383


Vol.9(3), pp. 15-26 , March 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJHC2016.0349
ISSN: 2141-6672



Full Length Research Paper

Change and continuity in the indigenous institution of Qoollee deejjoo ritual practice and its role in forest resource management among the Kafecho: The case of Gimbo Woreda



Zegeye W/Mariam
  • Zegeye W/Mariam
  • Bonga College of Teachers Education, History and cultural studies, mekelle university. Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 13 December 2016  Accepted: 14 February 2017  Published: 31 March 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


This ethnographic article explores the changes and continuities of indigenous Qoollee Deejjoo ritual practice, and its role in forest resource management among Kafecho peoples. The Kafecho people, who live in Southwestern Ethiopia have enormous indigenous intangible ritual practices which have never been well investigated and recognized clearly. This study focuses on Qoollee deejjoo ritual practice in Gimbo woreda. The above study site is selected as the main study area based on the availability of indigenous ritual practice, and the researcher’s personal experience. The researcher employed qualitative methods of data collection and analysis techniques. The major findings of the research pointed that Qoollee Deejjoo is a thanksgiving sacrifice ceremony to forest spirit (Qoolloo).  This research also shows that the ritual ceremony performed under forested landscape is symbolic reminder of the worshipers and their survival, which depends on the forest. Hence, the ritual practice recognizes and honors the ethics and taboos of forested landscape for what it is.   The sacrifice ceremony is exclusive. In addition, it plays a significant role in maintaining social coexistences, conflict settlement among its adherents.  Based on the research finding there are changes in the ritual practice. These changes include reduction in the number of participants, reduction in the number of the ritual places, clearance of the sacred ritual forest for other purpose and reluctant towards the norms, taboos and values of the ritual practice. Some of the agents for these changes are change in the belief system due to currently spreading evangelical Protestant missionaries, cultural diffusion due to ‘Westernization’ narratives, the state led intervention and its contradictions with local socio-cultural dynamics, and disempowerment of local cultural practices.  Finally, though there is big pressure and discouragement from internal and external dynamics against the practice of Qoollee Deejjoo, it is still representing the religious belief and cultural identity of its adherents in the study area.

Key words: Qoolloo, Qoollee Deejjoo, ritual practice, indigenous institution, sacred forest.

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APA Zegeye, W. M. (2017). Change and continuity in the indigenous institution of Qoollee deejjoo ritual practice and its role in forest resource management among the Kafecho: The case of Gimbo Woreda. African Journal of History and Culture, 9(3), 15-26.
Chicago Zegeye W/Mariam. "Change and continuity in the indigenous institution of Qoollee deejjoo ritual practice and its role in forest resource management among the Kafecho: The case of Gimbo Woreda." African Journal of History and Culture 9, no. 3 (2017): 15-26.
MLA Zegeye W/Mariam. "Change and continuity in the indigenous institution of Qoollee deejjoo ritual practice and its role in forest resource management among the Kafecho: The case of Gimbo Woreda." African Journal of History and Culture 9.3 (2017): 15-26.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJHC2016.0349
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJHC/article-abstract/6FBF2C663383

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