African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry
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Article Number - 728AF8B67156


Vol.11(6), pp. 50-53 , December 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJPAC2016. 0675
ISSN: 1996-0840



Full Length Research Paper

Determination of mercury and cadmium levels in omega-3 food supplements available on the Ghanaian market



Adolf Oti-Boakye
  • Adolf Oti-Boakye
  • Department of Chemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
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Akwasi Acheampong
  • Akwasi Acheampong
  • Department of Chemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
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Ohene Gyang Nathan
  • Ohene Gyang Nathan
  • Department of Science, Akrokeri College of Education, Ghana.
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Akorfa Akosua Agbosu
  • Akorfa Akosua Agbosu
  • Department of Science, Akrokeri College of Education, Ghana.
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Amoah Charles Agyei
  • Amoah Charles Agyei
  • Department of Science, Ola College of Education, Ghana.
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 Received: 04 February 2016  Accepted: 17 March 2017  Published: 31 December 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


The numerous reputed health benefits of the omega-3s (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]), particularly, their cardio-protective effects have led to the manufacture of omega-3 supplements by various pharmaceutical companies resulting in their flooding of the Ghanaian market. Coldwater fishes which are the primary sources of the omega-3 fatty acids are known to have high levels of mercury and cadmium in them. There is therefore the potential of mercury and cadmium poisoning in the course of people taking the omega-3 food supplements. Mercury and cadmium levels in ten products of omega-3 food supplements have been determined in order to ascertain their safety for human consumption. All the levels of mercury and cadmium determined were within the acceptable limits stipulated by Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization, and therefore do not pose any health threat to consumers.
 
Key words: Metals, omega-3, cardio-protective, pharmaceutical.

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APA Oti-Boakye, A., Acheampong, A., Nathan, O. G., Agbosu, A. A., & Agyei, A. C. (2017). Determination of mercury and cadmium levels in omega-3 food supplements available on the Ghanaian market. African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry, 11(6), 50-53.
Chicago Adolf Oti-Boakye, Akwasi Acheampong, Ohene Gyang Nathan, Akorfa Akosua Agbosu and Amoah Charles Agyei. "Determination of mercury and cadmium levels in omega-3 food supplements available on the Ghanaian market." African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry 11, no. 6 (2017): 50-53.
MLA Adolf Oti-Boakye, et al. "Determination of mercury and cadmium levels in omega-3 food supplements available on the Ghanaian market." African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry 11.6 (2017): 50-53.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJPAC2016. 0675
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJPAC/article-abstract/728AF8B67156

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