African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
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Article Number - 38E147365630


Vol.11(31), pp. 362-367 , August 2017
DOI: 10.5897/AJPP2016.4574
ISSN: 1996-0816



Full Length Research Paper

Health care providers’ knowledge, attitude and experience of adverse drug reaction reporting



Belete Kassa
  • Belete Kassa
  • Department of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Adugnaw Mulu
  • Adugnaw Mulu
  • Department of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Berhanu Geresu
  • Berhanu Geresu
  • Department of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 12 April 2016  Accepted: 08 June 2016  Published: 22 September 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is a noxious and undesirable reaction to drugs at dosage normally used in humans for diagnosis, treatment or prophylaxis of diseases or ailments. Spontaneous reporting is currently the major back bone for the detection of adverse drug reactions. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of health professionals towards ADR reporting in Boru Meda Hospital, North East Ethiopia. A quantitative cross-sectional study design was used. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from the health professionals, and the collected data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16). A test of association for selected variables was done using Pearson chi–square. From a total of 57 respondents, 40 (70.1%) were able to differentiate ADR from side effects. Thirty six (63.2%) and 34 (59.6%) respondents knew the availability of national reporting system and ADR reporting form in Ethiopia, respectively. Majority, 46 (80.7%), of the respondents said that ADR should be reported only when they are serious and life threatening. Out of 12 respondents who encountered ADR in the past 12 months in their clinical activities, 10 reported to responsible body. Health professionals working in Boru Meda Hospital have good attitude towards ADR reporting and good reporting culture of encountered ADRs, but insufficient knowledge about ADRs. The unavailability of ADR reporting forms take the lions part in significantly discouraging them to detect and report ADRs.

Key words: Adverse drug reactions, knowledge, attitude, practices, health professionals, pharmacovigilance, Boru Meda Hospital.

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APA Kassa, B., Mulu, A., & Geresu, B. (2017). Health care providers’ knowledge, attitude and experience of adverse drug reaction reporting. African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 11(31), 362-367.
Chicago Belete Kassa, Adugnaw Mulu and Berhanu Geresu. "Health care providers’ knowledge, attitude and experience of adverse drug reaction reporting." African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 11, no. 31 (2017): 362-367.
MLA Belete Kassa, Adugnaw Mulu and Berhanu Geresu. "Health care providers’ knowledge, attitude and experience of adverse drug reaction reporting." African Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 11.31 (2017): 362-367.
   
DOI 10.5897/AJPP2016.4574
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJPP/article-abstract/38E147365630

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