African Journal of Political Science and International Relations
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Article Number - 5CBBC8055610


Vol.12(1), pp. 10-21 , January 2018
https://doi.org/10.5897/AJPSIR2017.1052
ISSN: 1996-0832


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Full Length Research Paper

When party policies do not matter: Examination, the ambivalence of voting behaviors in the Zambian presidential elections



Greg Gondwe
  • Greg Gondwe
  • College of Media, Communication and Information, University of Colorado, United States.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 12 August 2017  Accepted: 01 November 2017  Published: 31 January 2018

Copyright © 2018 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Debates on whether people in Zambia cast their votes for a presidential candidate based on the good policies of the party or the qualifications of their candidate are peppered with tales of ethnicity, tribalism, corruption, and the education levels of the voters. These problems have undermined the credibility of the winning candidates as being put into office based not on their qualifications, but on the desire for individual voters to have someone of their tribe as president. While some scholars have argued that people are not naïve to vote for a candidate irrationally, others hanker on the fact that party policies are barely known to the Zambian voter who takes different forms of communal identities. The two approaches underscore the nascent debates of voting behaviors in Zambia today. Therefore, the aim of the study is to examine the voting behaviors of Zambians in the 2011 Zambian presidential election. Quantitative evidence suggests that party policies and manifestos in the Zambian elections do not matter because people base their votes on ethnic alignments.

Key words: Ethnicity, language, education, party policies, manifesto, Michael Sata, Hakainde Hichilema.

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APA Gondwe, G. (2018). When party policies do not matter: Examination, the ambivalence of voting behaviors in the Zambian presidential elections. African Journal of Political Science and International Relations, 12(1), 10-21.
Chicago Greg Gondwe. "When party policies do not matter: Examination, the ambivalence of voting behaviors in the Zambian presidential elections." African Journal of Political Science and International Relations 12, no. 1 (2018): 10-21.
MLA Greg Gondwe. "When party policies do not matter: Examination, the ambivalence of voting behaviors in the Zambian presidential elections." African Journal of Political Science and International Relations 12.1 (2018): 10-21.
   
DOI https://doi.org/10.5897/AJPSIR2017.1052
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJPSIR/article-abstract/5CBBC8055610

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