International Journal of
Biodiversity and Conservation

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Biodivers. Conserv.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-243X
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJBC
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 536

Full Length Research Paper

Structure and regeneration status of woody plants in the Hallideghie wildlife reserve, North East Ethiopia

Ahmed Endris
  • Ahmed Endris
  • Department of Biology, College of Science, Bahir Dar University, P. O. Box 3052, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
  • Google Scholar
Ali Seid
  • Ali Seid
  • Department of Biology, College of Science, Bahir Dar University, P. O. Box 3052, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
  • Google Scholar
Addisu Asefa
  • Addisu Asefa
  • Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Authority, P. O. Box 386, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 25 February 2017
  •  Accepted: 26 April 2017
  •  Published: 30 June 2017

Abstract

In this study, we examined vegetation structure and regeneration status of woody plants in the Hallideghie wildlife reserve, Ethiopia. We collected data on abundance, height and diameter at breast height (DBH) of woody plant species with DBH >2.5 cm within sixty-six 20 m × 20 m sample plots and counted number of individuals of seedlings (that is, individuals with height <1.5 m) and saplings (height >1.5 m and DBH <2.5 cm) of each species within five 1 m × 1 m subplots nested within each main plot. To describe vegetation structure, we computed DBH and height size frequency distributions of individuals and species importance value indexes (IVI). Overall, we recorded 986 individuals of tree/shrub stems, belonging to 46 woody plant species. Both the number of species and individuals represented in each DBH size class and height size class showed decreasing trends with increasing size classes. However, different species showed varying patterns of DBH size structure. IVI of species varied from 0.3 to 69.1. The average density of seedlings, saplings and matured woody plants in the HWR were 1345, 899 and 374 individuals/ha, respectively. Balanites aegyptiaca and Acacia tortilis, species with high IVIs, were also among those species that exhibited poor regeneration status.

 

Key words: DBH, importance values index (IVI), Prosopis juliflora, density, invasive species.