International Journal of
Biodiversity and Conservation

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Biodivers. Conserv.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-243X
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJBC
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 536

Full Length Research Paper

Human-wildlife conflict in Choke Mountains, Ethiopia

Bezihalem Nibret
  • Bezihalem Nibret
  • Department of Biology, Debre Markos University, P. O. Box 269, Debre Markos, Ethiopia.
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Mesele Yihune
  • Mesele Yihune
  • Department of Biology, Debre Markos University, P. O. Box 269, Debre Markos, Ethiopia.
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Bewuketu Takele
  • Bewuketu Takele
  • Department of Biology, Debre Markos University, P. O. Box 269, Debre Markos, Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 15 February 2016
  •  Accepted: 26 September 2016
  •  Published: 31 January 2017

Abstract

Human-wildlife conflict is widely known situation where people and wildlife share common resource. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived impact human-wildlife conflict (HWC) in the Choke Mountains, Ethiopia. Data were collected in 2014 and 2015 using semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussion. Pearson correlation was used to test the relationship between different factors. Majority of respondents (56%) reported the existence of HWC manifested through both crop damage and livestock predation. Anubis baboon, bush pig and porcupine were identified as major crop raiders in the study area. The most prominent sheep predation was caused by common jackal (51.6%). The average crop loss per household per year was 1.56 ± 0.42 quintal. There was a strong negative correlation between the extent of crop damage event and distance of the study area from forest edge (r = -0.67, P < 0.05). The average sheep loss per household by the common jackal in the last five year was 2.12 ± 0.63. Fire wood collection in the study area is negatively correlated with distance from the natural forest (r =-0.58, P < 0.05). Encouraging local communities to prepare private grazing land from their own farmland and to keep intact the habitat of wildlife should be done.

 

Key words: Choke Mountain, crop raiding, forest disturbance, predation.