International Journal of
Biodiversity and Conservation

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Biodivers. Conserv.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-243X
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJBC
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 539

Full Length Research Paper

Knowledge of conservationists on the effect of lead toxicity on the conservation status of African mourning dove (Streptopelia decipiens) in Ibadan, Nigeria

Afusat Jagun Jubril
  • Afusat Jagun Jubril
  • Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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Abosede Olayemi Omonona
  • Abosede Olayemi Omonona
  • Department of Wildlife and Ecotourism Management, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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Adetola Taiwo Adetuga
  • Adetola Taiwo Adetuga
  • Department of Wildlife and Ecotourism Management, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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Sarafadeen Adebayo Abioye
  • Sarafadeen Adebayo Abioye
  • Department of Wildlife and Ecotourism Management, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 07 May 2017
  •  Accepted: 13 September 2017
  •  Published: 31 October 2017

Abstract

The role of humans in any conservation action is vital and plays a key role in the success of biodiversity and wildlife conservation. The awareness and related activities of people to the risk of lead contamination as a threat to the conservation status is evaluated, particularly with respect to the status of the mourning dove. Lead pollution and toxicity has been reported in mourning dove with associated health and mortality patterns, and is therefore a recognised threat to the conservation of the species. This study therefore aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and perception of conservationists, who are the custodian of knowledge, on the conservation status of African mourning dove (Streptopelia decipiens) as a species model, and lead toxicity as an associated threat. The result shows that all the correspondents had varying degree of knowledge about the conservation of African mourning dove (S. decipiens) and the associated threat of lead toxicity. 16.3% of the respondents showed very high level of attitude, while 27.6 and 46.9% showed an average and high level of attitude to the conservation of African mourning dove (S. decipiens) and the associated threat of lead toxicity. Based on perception scores, 41.8% showed average level, while 28.6 and 5.1% showed high and very high level of perception, respectively; but 13.3% of the respondents showed low level of perception. Higher educational status corresponds to a higher knowledge, but less significant relationship to attitude and perception. It is concluded that, knowledge about conservation would affect the attitude and perception, though there are no significant gender and age differences regarding the topic.

Key words: African mourning dove (Streptopelia decipiens), biodiversity, wildlife conservation.