International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation
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Article Number - AC28E0F63831


Vol.9(5), pp. 122-129 , May 2017
DOI: 10.5897/IJBC2017.1082
ISSN: 2141-243X



Full Length Research Paper

Communal knowledge and perceptions of African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) reintroduction in the western part of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania



Emmanuel Hosiana Masenga
  • Emmanuel Hosiana Masenga
  • Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI), P.O. Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania
  • Google Scholar
Richard Daniel Lyamuya
  • Richard Daniel Lyamuya
  • Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Realfagbygget, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
  • Google Scholar
Ernest Eblate Mjingo
  • Ernest Eblate Mjingo
  • Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI), P.O. Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania
  • Google Scholar
Robert Dominikus Fyumagwa
  • Robert Dominikus Fyumagwa
  • Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI), P.O. Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania
  • Google Scholar
Eivin Røskaft
  • Eivin Røskaft
  • Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Realfagbygget, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 16 February 2017  Accepted: 23 March 2017  Published: 31 May 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


This study assessed communal knowledge and perceptions regarding the reintroduction of the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus). Questionnaires were employed to acquire information from 216 randomly selected respondents within six villages. Our results indicate that gender differences exist among respondents; more males than females correctly identified wild dogs from photo cards. Males also wanted the species to be of high conservation priority. Moreover, because of their education, more males suggested that the wild dog population should increase after being released into the Serengeti National Park (SNP). Finally, gender and education level significantly explained the variation of the outcome of answers with respect to wild dog reintroduction to SNP. The study recommends that conservation authorities should incorporate communal knowledge and perceptions during implementation of the wild dogs’ reintroduction programmes.
 
Key words: Gender, education, conservation priority, protected areas, reintroduction.

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APA Masenga, E. H., Lyamuya, R. D., Mjingo, E. E., Fyumagwa, R. D., & Røskaft, E. (2017). Communal knowledge and perceptions of African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) reintroduction in the western part of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation, 9(5), 122-129.
Chicago Emmanuel Hosiana Masenga, Richard Daniel Lyamuya, Ernest Eblate Mjingo, Robert Dominikus Fyumagwa and Eivin Røskaft  . "Communal knowledge and perceptions of African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) reintroduction in the western part of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania." International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation 9, no. 5 (2017): 122-129.
MLA Emmanuel Hosiana Masenga, et al. "Communal knowledge and perceptions of African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) reintroduction in the western part of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania." International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation 9.5 (2017): 122-129.
   
DOI 10.5897/IJBC2017.1082
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/IJBC/article-abstract/AC28E0F63831

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