International Journal of Genetics and Molecular Biology
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Article Number - DD0F75D48246


Vol.6(3), pp. 29-36 , October 2014
DOI: 10.5897/IJGMB2014.0097
ISSN: 2006-9863



Full Length Research Paper

Use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to establish genetic relationships among cassava cultivars released by different research groups in Ghanaian



Marian D. Quain
  • Marian D. Quain
  • Crops Research Institute (CRI) of Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CRI-CSIR)-Fumesua, Ghana, P.O. Box 3785, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Eric Warren Acquah
  • Eric Warren Acquah
  • Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Peter Twumasi*
  • Peter Twumasi*
  • Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Elizabeth Y. Parkes
  • Elizabeth Y. Parkes
  • Crops Research Institute (CRI) of Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CRI-CSIR)-Fumesua, Ghana, P.O. Box 3785, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 16 February 2014  Accepted: 08 October 2014  Published: 30 October 2014

Copyright © 2014 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is an important staple crop widely cultivated in Ghana. The crop also has diverse industrial applications including starch, beer and alcohol productions. Knowledge about the state of the Ghanaian cassava genetic diversity and population structure is paramount in breeding programmes aimed at cultivar improvements or breeding of new cultivars for specific purposes. This study focused on the use of 36 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) to produce SSR allelic polymorphisms for estimation of inter- and intra-population genetic diversity among Ghanaian cassava cultivars from five Ghanaian released and local cassava populations consisting of 11 released and two local cultivars. The results show high diversity among the studied cultivars with an average of seven (7) alleles per locus. Polymorphic loci varied from 68.6 to 100% with an average of 88.58%. A strong genetic diversity was observed within populations (HS =0.552) and therefore suggesting a low rate of inter-population gene flow among the individuals constituting the populations. This high genetic variability among the cultivars provides valuable genetic resource to support any future breeding programmes aimed at establishing new cassava varieties for domestic and industrial purposes.

 

Key words: Cassava, DNA fingerprinting, genetic diversity, simple sequence repeat (SSR).

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APA Twumasi, P., Acquah, E. W., Quain, M. D., & Parkes, E. Y. (2014). Use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to establish genetic relationships among cassava cultivars released by different research groups in Ghanaian. International Journal of Genetics and Molecular Biology, 6(3), 29-36.
Chicago Peter Twumasi, Eric Warren Acquah, Marian D. Quain and Elizabeth Y. Parkes. "Use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to establish genetic relationships among cassava cultivars released by different research groups in Ghanaian." International Journal of Genetics and Molecular Biology 6, no. 3 (2014): 29-36.
MLA Peter Twumasi, et al. "Use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to establish genetic relationships among cassava cultivars released by different research groups in Ghanaian." International Journal of Genetics and Molecular Biology 6.3 (2014): 29-36.
   
DOI 10.5897/IJGMB2014.0097
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/IJGMB/article-abstract/DD0F75D48246

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