International Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences
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Article Number - 27C020B55899


Vol.10(2), pp. 19-26 , February 2018
https://doi.org/10.5897/IJMMS2017.1343
ISSN: 2006-9723


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Full Length Research Paper

Determination, knowledge and prevalence of pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia among women of childbearing age at Same District Hospital in Tanzania



Ejike Daniel Eze
  • Ejike Daniel Eze
  • Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Kampala International University, Western Campus, Ishaka-Bushenyi, Uganda.
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Ambrose Barasa
  • Ambrose Barasa
  • Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kampala International University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
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Moses Dele Adams
  • Moses Dele Adams
  • Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bingham University, Karu, Nasarawa State, Nigeria.
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Karimah Mohammed Rabiu
  • Karimah Mohammed Rabiu
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Yobe State University, Damaturu, Yobe State, Nigeria.
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Iliya Ezekiel
  • Iliya Ezekiel
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal University, Wukari, Nigeria.
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Sheu Oluwadare Sulaiman
  • Sheu Oluwadare Sulaiman
  • Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kampala International University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
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Nganda Ponsiano
  • Nganda Ponsiano
  • Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Kampala International University, Western Campus, Ishaka-Bushenyi, Uganda.
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 Received: 09 November 2017  Accepted: 15 January 2018  Published: 28 February 2018

Copyright © 2018 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Several risk factors including hypertension are common complications of pregnancy with preeclampsia particularly associated with substantial risk to both the mother and fetus. This cross-sectional study involving quantitative approach was conducted in Same District Hospital in Tanzania. Data were collected from all pregnant women in the hospital using questionnaires. Respondents’ knowledge on maternal mortality regarding preeclampsia included those who had no knowledge 60(60%), and those who had knowledge 40(40%). Most of the respondents had no knowledge of maternal mortality due to the complications of preeclampsia. The study revealed that 64(64%), had positive attitude towards maternal mortality due to preeclampsia prevention while 36(36%) had no response. About 68(68%) of the respondents could not access the health facilities saying that these health facilities were not affordable citing that the distance was too long. They reported no health facilities and services as well as insecurity while looking for health facilities/services and finally that there were few health workers in the health facilities meaning that patients could not be attended to on time. Furthermore, health workers harassed the patients and make them seek other alternatives when they are sick, while minority 32(32%) said that the health facilities were accessible, affordable and efficient. Medical history during prenatal care showed that 25% of the respondent had increased blood pressure more than 140/90 mmHg, but only 10% had breath issues. Laboratory diagnosis of the respondents revealed increased proteinuria (48%) and impaired liver function (7%). Respondents experienced 39% convulsion and 24% pulmonary edema. Overall, the study identified a few predisposing factors to preeclampsia/eclampsia among pregnant women. Also, most of the respondents were said to have no knowledge of eclampsia thereby increasing maternal mortality.

Key words: Preeclampsia, hemolytic elevated liver enzymes, eclampsia, low platelet count, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, intrauterine growth restriction, intrauterine fetal death, pregnancy induced hypertension.

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APA Eze, E. D., Barasa, A., Adams, M. D., Rabiu, K. M., Ezekiel, I., Sulaiman, S. O., & Ponsiano, N. (2018). Determination, knowledge and prevalence of pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia among women of childbearing age at Same District Hospital in Tanzania. International Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences, 10(2), 19-26.
Chicago Ejike Daniel Eze, Ambrose Barasa, Moses Dele Adams, Karimah Mohammed Rabiu, Iliya Ezekiel, Sheu Oluwadare Sulaiman and Nganda Ponsiano. "Determination, knowledge and prevalence of pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia among women of childbearing age at Same District Hospital in Tanzania." International Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences 10, no. 2 (2018): 19-26.
MLA Ejike Daniel Eze, et al. "Determination, knowledge and prevalence of pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia among women of childbearing age at Same District Hospital in Tanzania." International Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences 10.2 (2018): 19-26.
   
DOI https://doi.org/10.5897/IJMMS2017.1343
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/IJMMS/article-abstract/27C020B55899

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