International Journal of
Nutrition and Metabolism

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Nutr. Metab.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2332
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJNAM
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 110

Full Length Research Paper

Dietary habits of pregnant women in Ogun-East Senatorial Zone, Ogun State, Nigeria: A comparative study

Oluwafolahan O. Sholeye*
  • Oluwafolahan O. Sholeye*
  • Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care, Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Catherine A. Badejo
  • Catherine A. Badejo
  • Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Olubukunola A. Jeminusi
  • Olubukunola A. Jeminusi
  • Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care, Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 12 June 2014
  •  Accepted: 07 July 2014
  •  Published: 31 August 2014

Abstract

Poor maternal nutrition in pregnancy leads to increased morbidity and negative pregnancy outcomes including low birth weight and peri-natal mortality. Pregnancy places extra demands on the body systems of pregnant women, necessitating optimal intake of essential nutrients. Rural and urban disparities in nutritional status have been documented in literature. A cross-sectional comparative assessment of the dietary intake of 720 pregnant women accessing antenatal care at selected rural and urban primary health centers, in Ogun State, was carried out using multi-stage sampling technique. Data was collected using semi-structured, interviewer-administered questionnaires and 24 h dietary recall forms. Data was analyzed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 15.00 and total intake assessment software. Relevant inferential statistics were calculated. The mean intake of most nutrients was significantly higher (p < 0.05) among the rural women than their urban counterparts, except for Vitamin A, Zinc and Iron. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the types of vegetables consumed by rural and urban respondents. The types of snacks consumed were significantly different (p = 0.032), but there was no difference (p = 0.652) in frequency of snack consumption between both groups. The rural women had higher nutrient consumption compared to their urban counterparts. Continuous nutrition education will go a long way in ensuring adequate nutrient intake among pregnant women.

 

Key words: Diet, intake, pregnant, Ogun.