International Journal of
Sociology and Anthropology

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Sociol. Anthropol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-988X
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJSA
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 273

Full Length Research Paper

Using social media to warn potential victims, and encourage youths to denounce crime and violence in Jamaica

Donnette Wright-Myrie
  • Donnette Wright-Myrie
  • The UWI School of Nursing, Mona, the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Christopher Charley
  • Christopher Charley
  • The Jamaica Constabulary Force, the Community Safety and Security Branch, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Andrea Hurst
  • Andrea Hurst
  • The Jamaica Constabulary Force, the Community Safety and Security Branch, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Kevin Walker
  • Kevin Walker
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Allan Carter
  • Allan Carter
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Ean McIntosh
  • Ean McIntosh
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Steve Tyndale
  • Steve Tyndale
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Melissa Brown
  • Melissa Brown
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Shanne Thomas
  • Shanne Thomas
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Carieca Willis
  • Carieca Willis
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Ann-Marie Anderson
  • Ann-Marie Anderson
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
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Jodean Brown
  • Jodean Brown
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
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  •  Received: 08 April 2016
  •  Accepted: 20 June 2016
  •  Published: 31 December 2016

Abstract

The youth cohort is the group most likely to be involved in criminal activities, being classified as either perpetrator or victim. This intervention explored the use of social media as a mechanism for sensitizing the youth cohort to the negative impact of crime, the value of shunning and denouncing it and the importance of supporting law enforcement efforts. A programmed intervention strategy was utilized to sensitize the youth cohort of the role in crime and foster a stronger relationship between the youth and the justice system. The results of the intervention suggested that youths generally repudiate crime, express mistrust for agents of the state and thought that crime fighting resources were limited. The impact of the cost of crime on the productive capacity of developing countries, such as Jamaica, has a far reaching and deleterious impact on the process of achieving sustainable development. Health, education and justice are pivotal factors influencing the perpetration of crime and violence or the lack thereof. Though novel in this setting, social media may be influential in bridging the gap between crime fighters and youth, and possibly facilitate opportunities for the communication of youthful perspectives on crime. This may serve to communicate the fresh ideas of the youth to the relevant authorities and lead to renewed and effective interventions using youth-led and youth centered reduction and prevention strategies.

Key words: Citizenry, youth, crime, social media, violence, developing countries.