International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology
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Article Number - 2DE664561879


Vol.8(9), pp. 76-86 , December 2016
DOI: 10.5897/IJSA2016.0659
ISSN: 2006-988X



Full Length Research Paper

Using social media to warn potential victims, and encourage youths to denounce crime and violence in Jamaica



Donnette Wright-Myrie
  • Donnette Wright-Myrie
  • The UWI School of Nursing, Mona, the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Christopher Charley
  • Christopher Charley
  • The Jamaica Constabulary Force, the Community Safety and Security Branch, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Andrea Hurst
  • Andrea Hurst
  • The Jamaica Constabulary Force, the Community Safety and Security Branch, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Kevin Walker
  • Kevin Walker
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Allan Carter
  • Allan Carter
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Ean McIntosh
  • Ean McIntosh
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Steve Tyndale
  • Steve Tyndale
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Melissa Brown
  • Melissa Brown
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Shanne Thomas
  • Shanne Thomas
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Carieca Willis
  • Carieca Willis
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Ann-Marie Anderson
  • Ann-Marie Anderson
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar
Jodean Brown
  • Jodean Brown
  • The National Police Youth Club Council, Jamaica.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 08 April 2016  Accepted: 20 June 2016  Published: 31 December 2016

Copyright © 2016 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


The youth cohort is the group most likely to be involved in criminal activities, being classified as either perpetrator or victim. This intervention explored the use of social media as a mechanism for sensitizing the youth cohort to the negative impact of crime, the value of shunning and denouncing it and the importance of supporting law enforcement efforts. A programmed intervention strategy was utilized to sensitize the youth cohort of the role in crime and foster a stronger relationship between the youth and the justice system. The results of the intervention suggested that youths generally repudiate crime, express mistrust for agents of the state and thought that crime fighting resources were limited. The impact of the cost of crime on the productive capacity of developing countries, such as Jamaica, has a far reaching and deleterious impact on the process of achieving sustainable development. Health, education and justice are pivotal factors influencing the perpetration of crime and violence or the lack thereof. Though novel in this setting, social media may be influential in bridging the gap between crime fighters and youth, and possibly facilitate opportunities for the communication of youthful perspectives on crime. This may serve to communicate the fresh ideas of the youth to the relevant authorities and lead to renewed and effective interventions using youth-led and youth centered reduction and prevention strategies.

Key words: Citizenry, youth, crime, social media, violence, developing countries.

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APA Wright-Myrie, D., Charley, C., Hurst, A., Walker, K., Carter, A., McIntosh, E., Tyndale, S., Brown, M., Thomas, S., Willis, C., Anderson, A., & Brown, J. (2016). Using social media to warn potential victims, and encourage youths to denounce crime and violence in Jamaica. International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology, 8(9), 76-86.
Chicago Donnette Wright-Myrie, Christopher Charley, Andrea Hurst, Kevin Walker, Allan Carter, Ean McIntosh, Steve Tyndale, Melissa Brown, Shann&e Thomas, Carieca Willis, Ann-Marie Anderson, and Jodean Brown. "Using social media to warn potential victims, and encourage youths to denounce crime and violence in Jamaica." International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology 8, no. 9 (2016): 76-86.
MLA Donnette Wright-Myrie, et al. "Using social media to warn potential victims, and encourage youths to denounce crime and violence in Jamaica." International Journal of Sociology and Anthropology 8.9 (2016): 76-86.
   
DOI 10.5897/IJSA2016.0659
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/IJSA/article-abstract/2DE664561879

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