ISABB Journal of Food and Agricultural Sciences
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Article Number - FA8945851332


Vol.5(3), pp. 14-20 , April 2015
DOI: 10.5897/ISABB-JFAS2015.0020
ISSN: 1937-3244



Full Length Research Paper

Effect of weed interference period on yield of transplanted tomato (Lycopersicon Esculentum M.) in Guder West Shewa-Oromia, Ethiopia



Tesfaye Amare
  • Tesfaye Amare
  • Department of Plant Sciences and Horticulture, Ambo University College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, P.O.Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Frehiwot Sileshi
  • Frehiwot Sileshi
  • Department of Plant Sciences and Horticulture, Ambo University College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, P.O.Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Ibrahim Hamza
  • Ibrahim Hamza
  • Department of Plant Sciences and Horticulture, Ambo University College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, P.O.Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 02 February 2015  Accepted: 05 March 2015  Published: 30 April 2015

Copyright © 2015 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


A field experiment was conducted for two consecutive cropping seasons (2013 and 2014) to estimate effect of weed interference period on transplanted tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum M.) in Guder West Shewa, Ethiopia. The experiment consisted of 14 treatments laid out in RCBD with three replications. From the total weed species, 81.81% were broadleaved weeds whereas 9.09 and 9.1% were sedges and grass weeds, respectively. During 2014 cropping season of the total weed flora, 83.3% were broad leaved weeds, 8.33 and 8.33% were sedges and grass weeds, respectively. Two years pooled data revealed that, density, weed dry biomass, tomato yield and relative yield loss were observed in all the two years. The lowest weed density was recorded in plot kept weed free, plot harvest (0.0 and 0.0 m-2) whereas the highest was recorded in no-weeded up to harvest (146.51, 161.33 m-2) in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Similarly, lowest (0.0, 0.0 gm-2) dry weight of weeds was recorded in weed free, whereas the highest was recorded in no-weeded up to harvest (1127.2, 1093.2 gm-2) in 2013 and 2014, respectively. The highest yield (32.04, 29.57 tons ha-1) was recorded in weed free plot which is not statistically significant with weed free up to 90 days after transplanting (DAT) (28.336, 31.511 tons ha-1) and no-weeded up to 15 DAT (29.894, 27.484 tons ha-1), whereas the lowest (4.00, 2.59 tons ha-1) was recorded from no-weeded up to harvest, respectively. Uninterrupted weed growth caused a reduction of (87.5, 90.8%), in tomato yield as compared to complete weed free in 2013 and 2014, respectively. 
 
Key words: Weed interference period, tomato yield, weed growth, yield loss.
 

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APA Amare, T., Sileshi, F., Hamza, I. (2015). Effect of weed interference period on yield of transplanted tomato (Lycopersicon Esculentum M.) in Guder West Shewa-Oromia, Ethiopia. ISABB Journal of Food and Agricultural Sciences, 5(3), 14-20.
Chicago Tesfaye Amare, Frehiwot Sileshi and Ibrahim Hamza. "Effect of weed interference period on yield of transplanted tomato (Lycopersicon Esculentum M.) in Guder West Shewa-Oromia, Ethiopia." ISABB Journal of Food and Agricultural Sciences 5, no. 3 (2015): 14-20.
MLA Tesfaye Amare, Frehiwot Sileshi and Ibrahim Hamza. "Effect of weed interference period on yield of transplanted tomato (Lycopersicon Esculentum M.) in Guder West Shewa-Oromia, Ethiopia." ISABB Journal of Food and Agricultural Sciences 5.3 (2015): 14-20.
   
DOI 10.5897/ISABB-JFAS2015.0020
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/ISABB-JFAS/article-abstract/FA8945851332

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