Journal of
Agricultural Biotechnology and Sustainable Development

  • Abbreviation: J. Agric. Biotech. Sustain. Dev.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2340
  • DOI: 10.5897/JABSD
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 112

Full Length Research Paper

Perception of climate extreme trends over three Ethiopian eco-environments: Comparison with records and analysis of determinants

Aklilu Mekasha*
  • Aklilu Mekasha*
  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) P. O. Box 2003, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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Chillot Yirga
  • Chillot Yirga
  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) P. O. Box 2003, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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Kindie Tesfaye
  • Kindie Tesfaye
  • International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), ILRI Campus, P. O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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Lisanework Nigatu
  • Lisanework Nigatu
  • Haramaya University, P. O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
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Alan J. Duncan
  • Alan J. Duncan
  • International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) P. O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 27 May 2016
  •  Accepted: 05 August 2016
  •  Published: 30 September 2016

Abstract

Understanding household perceptions of climate change and determinants of such perceptions are important for planning community/household based climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. In this study, herding/farming households’ perceptions were  studied and compared with recorded trends of extreme rainfall and temperature indicators from nearby weather stations across three eco-environments (pastoral, agro-pastoral and mixed crop-livestock highland system) in Ethiopia. Factors influencing household perceptions were assessed using a multinomial logit model. Results indicated that the majority of households (52.5-98.8%) across the three eco-environments perceived increasing numbers of extreme warm days and warm nights and decreasing numbers of extreme cool days and cool nights. In most cases, the household perceptions agreed with the recorded extreme temperature trends. Household perceptions of the studied extreme events were significantly affected by literacy, eco-environment, contact with the agricultural extension service, and presence of relief aid. We conclude that policy programs that enhance the literacy level of household and strengthen eco-environment-based extension services may increase the level of awareness and understanding of climate change by households which could help them to better adapt to climate change.

Key words: Determinant, Ethiopia, household, perception, rainfall, season, temperature.