Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development
Subscribe to JAERD
Full Name*
Email Address*

Article Number - B3F3CCC63870


Vol.9(5), pp. 74-83 , May 2017
DOI: 10.5897/JAERD2016.0832
ISSN: 2141-2170



Full Length Research Paper

Assessing the farmer field school’s diffusion of knowledge and adaptation to climate change by smallholder farmers in Kiboga District, Uganda



David Mfitumukiza
  • David Mfitumukiza
  • Makerere University Centre for Climate Change Research and Innovations, P. O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Bernard Barasa*
  • Bernard Barasa*
  • Makerere University Centre for Climate Change Research and Innovations, P. O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Ann Marie Nankya
  • Ann Marie Nankya
  • Department of Forestry, Biodiversity and Tourism, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Nabwire Dorothy
  • Nabwire Dorothy
  • The Hunger Project, Uganda, P. O. Box 26393 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Abbo Hellen Owasa
  • Abbo Hellen Owasa
  • The Hunger Project, Uganda, P. O. Box 26393 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Babu Siraj
  • Babu Siraj
  • The Hunger Project, Uganda, P. O. Box 26393 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Kato Gerald
  • Kato Gerald
  • The Hunger Project, Uganda, P. O. Box 26393 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 09 October 2016  Accepted: 03 March 2017  Published: 31 May 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Farmer Field Schools (FFS) can empower farmers through meetings at demonstration sites to promote agricultural production because of discovery learning. This study empirically investigated the FFS’s diffusion of knowledge and its impact on the smallholder farmer’s adaptation to climate change in Kiboga district characterised by low rainfall pattern. A cross-sectional research design was adopted where a total of 120 FFS-members and 60 non-FFS-members were randomly selected and interview using a validated household survey questionnaire. Data was analysed through descriptive statistics and Chi-test (2) to the relationship between the FFS and the member’s adaptation to climate change. The findings revealed that drought, hailstorms, changes in onset and cessation of seasons were the main seasonal manifestations of climate change experienced in the district. The FFS majorly diffused adaptation knowledge and skills through establishment of comparative studies (28%); establishment of commercial enterprises (21%) and training of the members (18%); distribution of inputs to the FFS (10), examination of performances of distributed inputs (8%), FFS exchange-visits (6%), graduation of FFS members (4%), field days (3%) and integration of village savings into FFS (2%) throughout the seasonal calendar.The FFS-members aggressively adapted to the manifestations of climate change through the application of micro-irrigation, early planting, mulching, seed multiplication, the sale of livestock, construction of barns and planting of drought-tolerant crop and pasture varieties during the eventualities on their farmlands. The FFS significantly contributed to the adaptation to climate change (drought and shifts in seasons) by the smallholder farmers (p<0.05) throughout the season in the study area.The FFS enabled the farmers to validate and adopt new technologies in their fields that were a success. The FFS-members increased their innovations and use of local resources in adaptation to climate change. The FFS’s promotion of adaptation options to climate change improves the farmer’s seasonal food security status.

Key words: Climate change, farmer field schools, smallholder farmers, diffusion.

Abele S, Pillay M (2007). Bacterial wilt and drought stresses in banana production and their impact on economic welfare in Uganda: Implications for banana research in East African highlands. J. Crop Improv. 19(1-2):173-91.
Crossref

 

Anandajayasekeram P, Davis KE, Workneh S (2007). Farmer field schools: an alternative to existing extension systems? Experience from Eastern and Southern Africa. J. Int. Agric. Ext. Educ. 14(1):81-93.
Crossref

 

Antwi-Agyei P, Stringer LC, Dougill AJ (2014). Livelihood adaptations to climate variability: insights from farming households in Ghana. Reg. Environ. Change 14(4):1615-1626.
Crossref

 

Apuuli B, Wright J, Elias C, Burton I (2000). Reconciling national and global priorities in adaptation to climate change: with an illustration from Uganda. Environ. Monit. Assess. 61(1):145-59.
Crossref

 

Barr A, Fafchamps M, Owens T (2005). The governance of non-governmental organizations in Uganda. World Dev. 33(4):657-79.
Crossref

 

Beswick A (2007). What Is Climate Change?. Prim. Sci. Rev. 96:11-14.

 

Burton I, Huq S, Lim B, Pilifosova O, Schipper EL (2002). From impacts assessment to adaptation priorities: the shaping of adaptation policy. Clim. Policy 2(2-3):145-59.
Crossref

 

Challinor A, Wheeler T, Garforth C, Craufurd P, Kassam A (2007). Assessing the vulnerability of food crop systems in Africa to climate change. Clim. Change 83(3):381-399.
Crossref

 

Christiaensen L, Demery L, Paternostro S (2003). Macro and micro perspectives of growth and poverty in Africa. World Bank Econ. Rev. 17(3):317-347.
Crossref

 

Davis K, Nkonya E, Kato E, Ayalew D, Odendo M, Miiro R, Nkuba J (2012). Impact of farmer field schools on agricultural productivity and poverty in East Africa. World Dev. 40(2):402-413.
Crossref

 

Ebwongu M, Adipala E, Ssekabembe CK, Kyamanywa S, Bhagsari AS (2001). Effect of intercropping maize and Solanum potato on yield of the component crops in central Uganda. Afr. Crop Sci. J. 9(1):83-96.
Crossref

 

Egeru A, Wasonga O, Kyagulanyi J, Majaliwa GM, MacOpiyo L, Mburu J (2014). Spatio-temporal dynamics of forage and land cover changes in Karamoja sub-region, Uganda. Pastoralism 4(1):6.
Crossref

 

Erbaugh JM, Donnermeyer J, Amujal M, Kidoido M (2010). Assessing the impact of farmer field school participation on IPM adoption in Uganda. J. Int. Agric. Ext. Educ. 17(3):5-17.
Crossref

 

Feder G, Murgai R, Quizon JB (2004). Sending farmers back to school: The impact of farmer field schools in Indonesia. Appl. Econ. Perspect. Policy 26(1):45-62.
Crossref

 

Friis-Hansen E, Duveskog D, Taylor EW (2012). Less noise in the household : the impact of Farmer Field Schools on Gender Relations. J. Res. Peace Gend. Dev. 2:44-55.

 

Garreaud R, Vuille M, Clement AC (2003). The climate of the Altiplano: observed current conditions and mechanisms of past changes. Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 194(1):5-22.
Crossref

 

Giorgi F (2006). Climate change hot-spots. Geophys.Res. Lett. 33(8).
Crossref

 

Godtland EM, Sadoulet E, De Janvry A, Murgai R, Ortiz O (2004). The impact of farmer field schools on knowledge and productivity: A study of potato farmers in the Peruvian Andes. Econ. Dev. Cult. Change 53(1):63-92.
Crossref

 

Guo M, Jia, Huang J, Kumar KB, Burger NE (2015). Farmer field school and farmer knowledge acquisition in rice production: Experimental evaluation in China. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 209:100-107.
Crossref

 

Hakiza JJ, Odogola RW, Mugisha J, Semana AR, Nalukwago J, Okoth J, Ekwamu A (2004). Challenges and prospects of disseminating technologies through farmer field schools: Lessons learnt based on experience from Uganda. Uganda J. Agric. Sci. 9:163-175.

 

Hepworth N, Goulden M, Hammond GP, Jones CI (2008). Climate Change in Uganda: Understanding the implications and appraising the response. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Energy, 161(July), 1–48. https://doi.org/10.1680/ener.2008.161.2.87

 

Hisali E, Birungi P, Buyinza F (2011). Adaptation to climate change in Uganda: evidence from micro level data. Glob. Environ. Change 21(4):1245-1261.
Crossref

 

Kugonza DR, Nabasirye M, Hanotte O, Mpairwe D, Okeyo AM (2012). Pastoralists' indigenous selection criteria and other breeding practices of the long-horned Ankole cattle in Uganda. Trop. Anim. Health Prod. 44(3):557-565.
Crossref

 

Lindell MK, Whitney DJ (2001). Accounting for common method variance in cross-sectional research designs. J. Appl. Psychol. 86(1):114.
Crossref

 

Mancini F, Jiggins J (2008). Appraisal of methods to evaluate farmer field schools. Dev. Practice 18(4-5):539-550.
Crossref

 

Mann CJ (2003). Observational research methods. Research design II: cohort, cross sectional, and case-control studies. Emerg. Med. J. 20(1):54-60.
Crossref

 

Mubaya CP, Njuki J, Mutsvangwa EP, Mugabe FT, Nanja D (2012). Climate variability and change or multiple stressors? Farmer perceptions regarding threats to livelihoods in Zimbabwe and Zambia. J. Environ. Manage. 102:9-17.
Crossref

 

Mugerwa S, Stephen K, Anthony E (2014). Status of livestock water sources in Karamoja sub-region, Uganda. Resour. Environ. 4(1):58-66.

 

Nimusiima A, Basalirwa C, Majaliwa J, Mbogga S, Mwavu E, Namaalwa J, Okello-Onen J (2014). Analysis of Future Climate Scenarios over Central Uganda Cattle Corridor. J. Earth Sci. Clim. Change 5(10).

 

O'Reilly CM, Alin SR, Plisnier PDD, Cohen AS, McKee BA (2003). Climate change decreases aquatic ecosystem productivity of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Nature 424(6950):766-768.
Crossref

 

Okonya JS, Syndikus K, Kroschel J (2013). Farmers' Perception of and Coping Strategies to Climate Change: Evidence From Six Agro-Ecological Zones of Uganda. J. Agric. Sci. 5(8):252-263.
Crossref

 

Palis FG (2006). The role of culture in farmer learning and technology adoption: a case study of farmer field schools among rice farmers in central Luzon, Philippines. Agric. Human Values 23(4):491-500.
Crossref

 

Patricola CM, Cook KH (2010). Northern African climate at the end of the twenty-first century: an integrated application of regional and global climate models. Clim. Dyn. 35(1):193-212.
Crossref

 

Patz JA, Campbell-Lendrum D, Holloway T, Foley JA (2005). Impact of regional climate change on human health. Nature 438(7066):310-317.
Crossref

 

Quizon J, Feder G, Murgai R (2001). Fiscal sustainability of agricultural extension: the case of the farmer field school approach. J. Int. Agric. Ext. Educ. 8(1):13-24.
Crossref

 

Rahmstorf S, Coumou D (2011). Increase of extreme events in a warming world. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 108(44):17905-17909.
Crossref

 

Reidsma P, Ewert F, Lansink AO, Leemans R (2010). Adaptation to climate change and climate variability in European agriculture: the importance of farm level responses. Euro. J. Agron. 32(1):91-102.
Crossref

 

Simpson BM, Owens M (2002). Farmer field schools and the future of agricultural extension in Africa. J. Int. Agric. Ext. Educ. 9(2):29-36.
Crossref

 

Sivakumar MV (2005). Impacts of natural disasters in agriculture, rangeland and forestry: an overview. InNatural disasters and extreme events in Agriculture 2005 (pp. 1-22). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
Crossref

 

Šmilauer P, Bernard B, Henry M, Paul N (2015). Piosphere syndrome and rangeland degradation in Karamoja sub-region, Uganda. Resour. Environ. 5(3):73-89.

 

Thiele G, Nelson R, Ortiz O, Sherwood S (2001). Participatory research and training: ten lessons from the Farmer Field Schools (FFS) in the Andes. Currents 27:4-11.

 

Thornton PK, Jones PG, Alagarswamy G, Andresen J (2009). Spatial variation of crop yield response to climate change in East Africa. Glob. Environ. Change 19(1):54-65.
Crossref

 

Thornton PK, Jones PG, Alagarswamy G, Andresen J, Herrero M (2010). Adapting to climate change: agricultural system and household impacts in East Africa. Agric. syst. 103(2):73-82.
Crossref

 

Vaarst M, Byarugaba DK, Nakavuma J, Laker C (2007). Participatory livestock farmer training for improvement of animal health in rural and peri-urban smallholder dairy herds in Jinja, Uganda. Trop. Anim. Health Prod. 39(1):1-11.
Crossref

 

Van Asten PJ, Fermont AM, Taulya G (2011). Drought is a major yield loss factor for rainfed East African highland banana. Agric. water manag. 98(4):541-552.
Crossref

 

Vermeulen SJ, Campbell BM, Ingram JS (2012). Climate change and food systems. Ann. Rev. Environ. Resour. 37(1):195.
Crossref

 


APA Mfitumukiza, D., Barasa, B., Nankya, A. M., Dorothy, N., Owasa, A. H., Siraj, B., & Gerald, K. (2017). Assessing the farmer field school’s diffusion of knowledge and adaptation to climate change by smallholder farmers in Kiboga District, Uganda. Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development, 9(5), 74-83.
Chicago David Mfitumukiza, Bernard Barasa, Ann Marie Nankya, Nabwire Dorothy, Abbo Hellen Owasa, Babu Siraj and Kato Gerald. "Assessing the farmer field school’s diffusion of knowledge and adaptation to climate change by smallholder farmers in Kiboga District, Uganda." Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development 9, no. 5 (2017): 74-83.
MLA David Mfitumukiza, et al. "Assessing the farmer field school’s diffusion of knowledge and adaptation to climate change by smallholder farmers in Kiboga District, Uganda." Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development 9.5 (2017): 74-83.
   
DOI 10.5897/JAERD2016.0832
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/JAERD/article-abstract/B3F3CCC63870

Subscription Form