Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development
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Article Number - D620D5666415


Vol.9(11), pp. 255-261 , November 2017
DOI: 10.5897/JAERD2017.0905
ISSN: 2141-2170



Full Length Research Paper

Harmonization of extension messages on climate smart agriculture in Malawi: Do we speak with one voice, and to whom?



Tasokwa V. Kakota
  • Tasokwa V. Kakota
  • Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Bunda Campus, P. O. Box 219, Lilongwe, Malawi.
  • Google Scholar
Beston B. Maonga
  • Beston B. Maonga
  • Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Bunda Campus, P. O. Box 219, Lilongwe, Malawi.
  • Google Scholar
Gry Synnevag
  • Gry Synnevag
  • Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Noragric 1432 Ås, Norway.
  • Google Scholar
Charity Chonde
  • Charity Chonde
  • Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Bunda Campus, P. O. Box 219, Lilongwe, Malawi.
  • Google Scholar
Michael Mainje
  • Michael Mainje
  • Development Fund of Norway, Lilongwe, Malawi.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 08 August 2017  Accepted: 06 October 2017  Published: 30 November 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Poor access to extension services has been one of the major challenges that smallholder farmers in Malawi face. Dissemination of agricultural technologies is mainly done through field level extension workers and lead farmers; however, such workers are few in number. In addition to this, there is lack of harmonization of messages, approaches and methods in extension delivery at field level. Using baseline cross-sectional data, this study aims at contributing towards harmonization of extension messages and coordination of extension service providers in the implementation of climate smart agriculture technologies in Malawi. Existing information channels for disseminating climate smart agriculture and the capacity of extension workers and lead farmers were analyzed. Key study findings include poor coordination among stakeholders in the delivery, message package and incentive schemes; nonexistence of government approved climate smart agriculture specific training manuals among stakeholders; lack of knowledge and skills among field level extension workers in disseminating climate smart agriculture technologies; and limited access to knowledge and information by female farmers. The study recommends a harmonized and gender sensitive approach in extension delivery, coordination in the implementation of climate smart agriculture activities, and strengthening of District Agriculture Extension Committees for improved facilitation in extension delivery.

Key words: Extension, climate smart agriculture, smallholder farmers, Malawi.

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APA Kakota, T. V., Maonga, B. B., Synnevag, G., Chonde, C., & Mainje, M. (2017). Harmonization of extension messages on climate smart agriculture in Malawi: Do we speak with one voice, and to whom?. Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development, 9(11), 255-261.
Chicago Tasokwa V. Kakota, Beston B. Maonga, Gry Synnevag, Charity Chonde and Michael Mainje. "Harmonization of extension messages on climate smart agriculture in Malawi: Do we speak with one voice, and to whom?." Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development 9, no. 11 (2017): 255-261.
MLA Tasokwa V. Kakota, et al. "Harmonization of extension messages on climate smart agriculture in Malawi: Do we speak with one voice, and to whom?." Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development 9.11 (2017): 255-261.
   
DOI 10.5897/JAERD2017.0905
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/JAERD/article-abstract/D620D5666415

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