Journal of
AIDS and HIV Research

  • Abbreviation: J. AIDS HIV Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2359
  • DOI: 10.5897/JAHR
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 258

Full Length Research Paper

HIV/AIDS-related stigmatization and discrimination and coping strategies among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) at the anti-retroviral (ARV) Clinic, University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria

Oluwasola Deborah Olusola
  • Oluwasola Deborah Olusola
  • Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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Oshiname Olore Fredrick
  • Oshiname Olore Fredrick
  • Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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Agofure Otovwe
  • Agofure Otovwe
  • Department of Public and Community Health, Novena University, Ogume, Delta State, Nigeria.
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Oluwasola Olayiwola Abideen
  • Oluwasola Olayiwola Abideen
  • Department of Pathology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 15 September 2017
  •  Accepted: 06 October 2017
  •  Published: 30 November 2017

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of HIV/AIDS related stigmatization, discrimination and coping strategies among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) at University College Hospital Ibadan. The study adopted a descriptive cross-sectional study design carried out among 700 PLHIV selected using a systematic random sampling technique from May to June 2010.  A validated pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using SPSS version 16. The mean age of the respondents was 40.0 ± 9.40 years and more were females (474, 67.70%). About 212 (30.30%) have experienced stigmatization with verbal insult (138, 65.10%), subjection to ridicule (134, 63.20%) and avoidance by friends (89, 42.0%) being the most reported forms of induced stigmatization/discrimination. In addition, there was no significant relationship of experiencing stigmatization/discrimination by gender (P=0.097). However, more females experienced physical assault than male. Strategies adopted by respondents in coping with stigmatization and discrimination were unmoved 376 (53.70%), prayer 321 (45.90%) and ignoring the person 281 (40.10%). The study reported prevalence of various forms of stigmatization and discrimination against PLHIV. Therefore, there is need for more awareness campaign in communities on the dangers of HIV-related stigmatization and discrimination on the health of PLHIV.

Key words: Social discrimination, perception, stigmatization, social support, HIV/AIDS.