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Article Number - 48F63E566015


Vol.7(1), pp. 1-9 , September 2017
DOI: 10.5897/JBSB2016.0057
ISSN: 2141-2200



Full Length Research Paper

Extrapolating human toxicity data with target organ dose (TOD-Wb) model: A meso-scale allometric analytical approach



Swee-Cheng FOO
  • Swee-Cheng FOO
  • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
  • Google Scholar
Ivan Siang-Meng SIN
  • Ivan Siang-Meng SIN
  • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
  • Google Scholar
Hui-Fang ANG
  • Hui-Fang ANG
  • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
  • Google Scholar
Rachel Qian-Yun CHE
  • Rachel Qian-Yun CHE
  • Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 28 December 2016  Accepted: 24 July 2017  Published: 30 September 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


An allometric target organ dose model (TOD-Wb) with variable scaling exponent, b = br + bo(bm) - bi, is proposed for the extrapolation of animal toxicity to human. The exponent b comprises four constituent parameters representing the intake mode to entry organ (bi), route of transportation to target organ (br), mass of target organ (bo), and rate of metabolism at target organ (bm). This expression enables the a priori determination of b from known values of bi, br, bo, and bm. From nipradilol that target the respiratory system, the br values determined for intragastric (ig), intraperitoneal (ip), intravenous (iv), and subcutaneous (sc) injections were 0.15, 0.26, 0.03, and 0.61, respectively; from HF mouth breathing data, the br value is 0.07 for pulmonary absorption through inhalation (ih); and from actinomycin D data that target bone marrow through the ip-route, the bo value is 0.53. The model is tested with the parameter values obtained from literature; validating the a priori values determined in this paper with the empirical values measured. For ip-administration of OMPA and parathion, the a priori [3/4(bo) - 1] value and empirical value are -0.475 and -0.48; for nine alkylating agents, the values are -0.60 and -0.61; for ig-administration of NaCN, the [br + 3/4(bo) - 1] and empirical values are -0.1 and -0.092, respectively. The analysis of toxic gas inhalation data in student projects are also summarized herein. Consequently, values of these parameters can also be estimated by fitting known toxicity data to the TOD-Wb model.

Key words: Target organ dose model, allometric scaling, extrapolating human toxicity.

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APA FOO, S., SIN, I. S., ANG, H., & CHE, R. Q. (2017). Extrapolating human toxicity data with target organ dose (TOD-Wb) model: A meso-scale allometric analytical approach. Journal of Biophysics and Structural Biology, 7(1), 1-9.
Chicago Swee-Cheng FOO, Ivan Siang-Meng SIN, Hui-Fang ANG and Rachel Qian-Yun CHE. "Extrapolating human toxicity data with target organ dose (TOD-Wb) model: A meso-scale allometric analytical approach." Journal of Biophysics and Structural Biology 7, no. 1 (2017): 1-9.
MLA Swee-Cheng FOO, et al. "Extrapolating human toxicity data with target organ dose (TOD-Wb) model: A meso-scale allometric analytical approach." Journal of Biophysics and Structural Biology 7.1 (2017): 1-9.
   
DOI 10.5897/JBSB2016.0057
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/JBSB/article-abstract/48F63E566015

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