Journal of
Infectious Diseases and Immunity

  • Abbreviation: J. Infect. Dis. Immun.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2375
  • DOI: 10.5897/JIDI
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 75

Full Length Research Paper

Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites of laboratory animals at Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute (EHNRI), Addis Ababa

Tadesse Gudissa1, Hailu Mazengia2*, S. Alemu1 and Haileleul Nigussie3
1Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Gondar University, P. O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia. 2College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Bahir Dar University, P. O. Box 79, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. 3School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Health Science, Addis Ababa University, P. O. Box 34, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia.
Email: [email protected]

  • Article Number - 34872143416
  • Vol.3(1), pp. 1-5, January 2011
  •  Accepted: 14 December 2010
  •  Published: 31 January 2011

Abstract

A study on prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites of laboratory animals was conducted from November 2009 to March 2010 at the Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute (EHNRI), Addis Ababa. For this study, faecal samples were collected from a total of 210 laboratory animals which include 140 mice (Swiss albino), 56 rats (Wistar) and 14 guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). The collected faecal samples were examined by simple faecal flotation techniques for isolation of parasitic eggs and/or oocysts. Out of 210 faecal samples examined, 79 (37.62%) were infected with gastrointestinal parasites. There was significant difference (P<0.05) in prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in rats, mice and guinea pigs with prevalence of 41.07, 30 and 100%, respectively. Nematodes, cestodes and Eimeria caviae have been detected. Among nematode parasites, the prevalence of Aspiculuris tetraptera and Syphacia obvelata were found with prevalence of 21.43 and 1.43%, respectively. The highest prevalence of nematodes was found in mice (28.57%) followed by rats (7.14%). Hymenolepis nana andHymenolepis diminuta were cestodes detected with the highest prevalence in rats (33.93%) followed by mice (1.43%). In mice, the highest prevalence of helminths was at 10 weeks of age (21.43%) while the lowest was in 4 weeks of age (2.14%). There was significant difference (P<0.05) in prevalence of helminths among the different age groups. Ecaviae were detected only from guinea pigs at 16 weeks of age.

 

Key words: Gastrointestinal parasites, laboratory animals, prevalence.

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