Journal of Infectious Diseases and Immunity
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Article Number - A4C5D4061045


Vol.8(1), pp. 1-9 , October 2016
DOI: 10.5897/JIDI2016.0157
ISSN: 2141-2375



Full Length Research Paper

Directly observed treatment short-course compliance and associated factors among adult tuberculosis cases in public health institutions of Hadiya zone, Southern Ethiopia



Bayu Begashaw
  • Bayu Begashaw
  • Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, P.O. Box, 260, Mizan -Aman, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Lonsako Abute
  • Lonsako Abute
  • Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, P.O. Box, 260, Mizan -Aman, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Tegene Legese
  • Tegene Legese
  • Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, P.O. Box, 260, Mizan -Aman, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 20 July 2016  Accepted: 20 September 2016  Published: 31 October 2016

Copyright © 2016 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in Ethiopia. This is at various levels of prevention; connected to early detection, prompt treatment seeking and compliance behavior of patients. DOTS is important strategy to tackle its prevalence and severity among public. In addition, development of MDR-TB is another emerging agenda which mainly happens as a result of poor compliance to treatment regimen. The main aim of this study is assessing DOT treatment compliance and associated factors among adult patients of TB treatment service. Facility based cross- sectional study triangulated with in-depth interview was conducted between March and April, 2015 in public health facilities of Hadiya zone. Data were collected from 203 respondents selected by simple random sampling using pre-tested structured questionnaire. Ethical clearance was collected from the ethical clearance committee of Jimma University, College of health science. We used adapted instrument composed of behavioral, therapy, social and facility related variables. Descriptive statistic and logistic regression analysis were employed to identify factors associated with DOTS compliance in TB patients. We used odds ratio and 95%CI to declare significant factor fits. Then quantitative data were triangulated with qualitative data. Finally, the findings were presented in narrative texts, tables and graphs. A total of 203 tuberculosis patients were interviewed; nearly three quarters (75.9) were rural dwellers. 142 (70%) of the respondents were compliant with in the last seven days. Majority (84%) of the respondents were morning time compliant. Average number of day that patient takes the drug in 1 week is 6.6 and most of them (72.50%) takes seven days. Phase of treatment, knowledge, getting encouragement, perceived severity, distance from health facility and getting advice were significantly associated at p-value<0.05 with DOTS compliance. Moreover distance and getting advice in intensive phase and absence of symptom, waiting time and getting encouragement in continuation phase were significantly associated. DOTS compliance in this study is poor relative to other studies. Special attention on compliance counseling should be given for those patients who have no symptom in continuation phase, distant patients in intensive phase and those who did not get social support.

Key words: Adult patients, compliance, DOTS treatment.

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APA Begashaw, B., Abute, L., & Legese, T. (2016). Directly observed treatment short-course compliance and associated factors among adult tuberculosis cases in public health institutions of Hadiya zone, Southern Ethiopia. Journal of Infectious Diseases and Immunity, 8(1), 1-9.
Chicago Bayu Begashaw, Lonsako Abute and Tegene Legese. "Directly observed treatment short-course compliance and associated factors among adult tuberculosis cases in public health institutions of Hadiya zone, Southern Ethiopia." Journal of Infectious Diseases and Immunity 8, no. 1 (2016): 1-9.
MLA Bayu Begashaw, Lonsako Abute and Tegene Legese. "Directly observed treatment short-course compliance and associated factors among adult tuberculosis cases in public health institutions of Hadiya zone, Southern Ethiopia." Journal of Infectious Diseases and Immunity 8.1 (2016): 1-9.
   
DOI 10.5897/JIDI2016.0157
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/JIDI/article-abstract/A4C5D4061045

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