Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 474

Full Length Research Paper

Substance use and factors associated with risky sexual practice in school youth in Asella Town, South-East Ethiopia, 2017

Solomon Mariam W.
  • Solomon Mariam W.
  • Assela Town Health Office, Assella, Ethiopia.
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Nega Assefa
  • Nega Assefa
  • Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Haramaya University, Ethiopia.
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Solomon Tejineh
  • Solomon Tejineh
  • Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Arsi University, P. O. Box 396, Assela, Ethiopia.
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Hiwot Zelalem
  • Hiwot Zelalem
  • Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Arsi University, P. O. Box 396, Assela, Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 11 August 2017
  •  Accepted: 18 September 2017
  •  Published: 31 January 2018

Abstract

Globally, risky sexual behavior accounts for large number of opportunities for sexually transmitted infection including human immunodeficiency virus and unintended pregnancy. The study is intended to describe substance use and factors associated with risky sexual practice among school youth. School based cross sectional study was conducted through self-administered questionnaire. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 614. Epi info Version 7 and SPSS version 21 were used. Descriptive statistics and binary multiple logistic regression analysis was done by including variables with p<0.2 in the crude analysis and P-value<0.05 was considered statistically significant. From study participants; 201(33.6%) respondents were sexually active. Among them, 120 (20.07%) had practiced risky sexual intercourse, during sexual intercourse 112 (18.7%) did not use condom consistently. Peer pressure influence to sexual intercourse were 4.4 times more likely having risky sexual practice compared to those who had no influenced by peers pressure [AOR: 4.4 ,95% CI (2.748,6.917)]. Students who drink alcohol were 1.98 more likely to have risky sexual practice than those who did not drink alcohol [AOR=1.98, 95% CI (1.224, 3.190)]. Students who did not discuss openly about sexual and reproductive health issues with parents were 1.86 times more likely to practice risky sexual intercourse compared to their counterparts (AOR:1.86, 95%CI (1.149, 3.009). Conclusively, risky sexual behavior and substance use related issues should be considered in school curriculum. Health authorities should implement youth friendly services in schools and government bodies should incise a strict and sustainable measurement against selling alcohol to under 18 years old.

Key words: Risky sexual behavior, substance use, school youth.