Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 459

Full Length Research Paper

Prevalence of occupational injuries and associated factors among construction workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Hanna Mersha
  • Hanna Mersha
  • Department of Epidemiology, Jimma University, P. O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
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Seid Tiku Mereta
  • Seid Tiku Mereta
  • Department of Environmental Health Science and Technology, Jimma University, P. O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
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Lamessa Dube
  • Lamessa Dube
  • Department of Epidemiology, Jimma University, P. O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 16 October 2016
  •  Accepted: 16 November 2016
  •  Published: 31 January 2017

Abstract

The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of occupational injuries and associated factors among building construction workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 licensed building construction companies in Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia. A multi-stage sampling was used to recruit 809 study participants. Data was collected using face to face interview and observational checklist. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical software. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. A total of 683 (84.7%) respondents reported occupational injuries during the past 12 months giving an overall annual prevalence rate of 847 injuries per 1000 construction workers. Of the total 683 injured respondents, 74 (10.8%) were hospitalized. The odds of injuries were two times higher among males when compared with females (OR=2.17, 95%CI (1.47-3.19). Not having job satisfaction increased the odds of occupational injuries by about four folds as compared to those who are satisfied with their job (OR = 4.82, 95% CI (2.75-8.46). Working for more than 48 h per week, lack of vocational trainings, not using of personal protective equipment had significantly contributed to the higher risks of occupational injuries.

 

Key words: Construction, injury, health, occupational safety, prevalence.