Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 464

Full Length Research Paper

Investigation on the effect of a one-day pharmacovigilance training of healthcare professionals

Mukesh Dheda
  • Mukesh Dheda
  • National Department of Health, Pharmacovigilance Centre for Public Health Programs, South Africa.
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Henry Kambafwile
  • Henry Kambafwile
  • National Department of Health, Pharmacovigilance Centre for Public Health Programs, South Africa.
  • Google Scholar
Frasia Oosthuizen
  • Frasia Oosthuizen
  • School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 21 August 2017
  •  Accepted: 25 October 2017
  •  Published: 30 June 2018

Abstract

A key objective of the decentralized pharmacovigilance program is to increase the knowledge of in-service healthcare professionals in pharmacovigilance to enable them develop a culture and practice of adverse drug reactions reporting. It is imperative to evaluate the impact of the training offered, as it is a key component of the national decentralized pharmacovigilance program. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day decentralized pharmacovigilance program training of healthcare professionals on pharmacovigilance in South Africa. Self-administered structured, pre- and post-training questionnaires were retrospectively reviewed. The healthcare professionals’ knowledge regarding pharmacovigilance in South Africa significantly increased after the one-day training intervention (P < 0.002). There was an increase in the number of correct answers to every question, although to varying degrees. However, despite this increase, it is clear that various aspects of the overall training need to be re-emphasized to have an even greater impact, and there is a strong indication of a positive shift in pharmacovigilance knowledge gained, though to varying degrees.

Key words: Pharmacovigilance, training, health care professionals, impact.