Journal of
Parasitology and Vector Biology

  • Abbreviation: J. Parasitol. Vector Biol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2510
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPVB
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 153

Full Length Research Paper

Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in non-human primates at a primate center at Franceville, Gabon

Jean Paul Akue
  • Jean Paul Akue
  • Departement de Parasitologie Médicales (UPARAM), Centre International de recherches Medicales de Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville Gabon.
  • Google Scholar
Natacha Efoua Tomo
  • Natacha Efoua Tomo
  • Institut de Recherches Agronomiques et forestières (IRAF/CENAREST), Gabon.
  • Google Scholar
Julie Badiambile
  • Julie Badiambile
  • Departement de Zootechnologie, institut National Supérieur d'Agronomie et de Biotechnologie (INSAB), USTM, Franceville, Gabon.
  • Google Scholar
Hubert Moukana
  • Hubert Moukana
  • Departement de Parasitologie Médicales (UPARAM), Centre International de recherches Medicales de Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville Gabon.
  • Google Scholar
Roger Antoine Mbou-Mountsimbi
  • Roger Antoine Mbou-Mountsimbi
  • Departement de Parasitologie Médicales (UPARAM), Centre International de recherches Medicales de Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville Gabon.
  • Google Scholar
Barthelemy Ngoubangoye
  • Barthelemy Ngoubangoye
  • Centre de Primatology (CDP) CIRMF, Franceville, Gabon.
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  •  Received: 04 June 2017
  •  Accepted: 30 August 2017
  •  Published: 31 January 2018

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii can cause fatal disease in both humans and non-human primates. Neospora caninum can also cause economic loss and disease to livestock. The distribution of antibodies against these parasites in non-human primates bred at the CIRMF Primate Center in Franceville, Gabon was determined. For their annual medical examination, T. gondii antibodies were identified using a modified agglutination test (MAT). Twenty-one percent were positive with antibody titers varying from 1:40 to 1:4000. Pan troglodytes (n=38; 42.1%) had the highest seroprevalence followed by Mandrillus sphinx (n=139; 16.5%). Only one Gorilla gorilla out of the four examined and one Cercopithecus solatus out of 12 were positive. At the same time, the general seroprevalence of N. caninum determined by competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was 68.67% in the four species tested. M. sphinx (n=139; 66.12%), P. troglodytes (n=38; 16.75%), C. solatus (n=12; 4.75%), and G. gorilla (n=4; 1.10%) had the highest prevalence. Co-infection was noted in 24.07% of the positive cases. This study suggests that these primates may constitute different reservoirs for T. gondii and N. caninum in the cystic form and high distribution of these parasites in this environment.

 

Key words: Toxoplasma gondii. Neospora caninum, antibodies, old world monkeys.