Journal of Soil Science and Environmental Management
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Article Number - D0B4DBF40743


Vol.4(5), pp. 93-99 , September 2013
https://doi.org/10.5897/JSSEM2012.083
ISSN: 2141-2391


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Full Length Research Paper

Farmers’ perception of soil fertility problems and their attitudes towards integrated soil fertility management for coffee in Northern Tanzania



Godsteven P. Maro
  • Godsteven P. Maro
  • TaCRI, Lyamungu P. O. Box 3004, Moshi, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Jerome P. Mrema
  • Jerome P. Mrema
  • Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P. O, Box 3008, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Balthazar M. Msanya
  • Balthazar M. Msanya
  • Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P. O, Box 3008, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
James M. Teri
  • James M. Teri
  • TaCRI, Lyamungu P. O. Box 3004, Moshi, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar







 Published: 21 September 2013

Copyright © 2013 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


 

A study was conducted in Hai and Lushoto districts, Northern Tanzania to establish the farmers’ perception of soil fertility problems and their attitudes towards integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) for coffee, thereby identifying the appropriate intervention strategies. The study was based on a structured questionnaire involving 126 respondents. Both farmers’ awareness of the problem and their attitudes were highly significant (at p<0.01). Age, household size, and adoption of improved coffee varieties, affected farmers’ awareness significantly (p<0.05). As for farmers’ attitudes, six of the eight predictors were significant (p<0.05). Age, household size, adoption of new varieties and total farm income were highly significant (p<0.01). Age, total land under coffee and total off-farm income negatively affected farmers’ attitudes. As farmers get older, they tend to refrain from innovation. Larger farms are likely to exert more pressure on the available organic resources. With multiple farms, distant farms are likely to receive less attention. When off-farm income was considered, multiple ventures compete for the farmers’ time, resources and attention. For the two districts, ISFM interventions will make a better impact to younger and more energetic farmers with sufficient lands for commercial coffee production and to farmers who depend largely on this resource for their livelihood.

 

Key words: Soil fertility, farmers’ perception, integrated soil fertility management (ISFM), coffee, Tanzania.

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APA (2013). Farmers’ perception of soil fertility problems and their attitudes towards integrated soil fertility management for coffee in Northern Tanzania. Journal of Soil Science and Environmental Management, 4(5), 93-99.
Chicago Godsteven P. Maro, Jerome P. Mrema, Balthazar M. Msanya and James M. Teri. "Farmers’ perception of soil fertility problems and their attitudes towards integrated soil fertility management for coffee in Northern Tanzania." Journal of Soil Science and Environmental Management 4, no. 5 (2013): 93-99.
MLA Godsteven P. Maro, et al. "Farmers’ perception of soil fertility problems and their attitudes towards integrated soil fertility management for coffee in Northern Tanzania." Journal of Soil Science and Environmental Management 4.5 (2013): 93-99.
   
DOI https://doi.org/10.5897/JSSEM2012.083
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/JSSEM/article-abstract/D0B4DBF40743

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