Journal of
Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences

  • Abbreviation: J. Toxicol. Environ. Health Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9820
  • DOI: 10.5897/JTEHS
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 181

Full Length Research Paper

Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus) in Ogun State, Nigeria

Durojaye A. Soewu*
  • Durojaye A. Soewu*
  • Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Management, College of Agriculture, Osun State University, P.M.B.4494, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria.
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Olufemi M. Agbolade
  • Olufemi M. Agbolade
  • Department of Plant Science and Applied Zoology, Faculty of Science, Olabisi Onabanjo University, P.M.B. 2002, Ago- Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria.
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Rasheed Y. Oladunjoye
  • Rasheed Y. Oladunjoye
  • Department of Plant Science and Applied Zoology, Faculty of Science, Olabisi Onabanjo University, P.M.B. 2002, Ago- Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria.
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Ibukun A. Ayodele
  • Ibukun A. Ayodele
  • Department of Wildlife and Ecotourism Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 07 June 2014
  •  Accepted: 26 August 2014
  •  Published: 31 October 2014

Abstract

Wild animals have provided complimentary protein for human populations across the world over the centuries. This study investigated on bioaccumulation of heavy metals in different organs of cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus) and the health implications of its consumption. Four carcasses were collected from each of the four ecotomes (Mosinmi, Agbara, Omo forest reserve and Ibese) and concentrations of 7 heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb, Mn, Cr, Zn) were examined in four organs (skin, liver, lung and kidney) from each specimen used by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Analysis of variance revealed no significant difference (P>0.05) in the concentration of metals in the animal except Fe  and  Cu,  while  significant  variation  exists  when  specimens  were  compared  across  different ecotomes. Total mean concentrations were Fe (400.512±60.0107), Cu (8.569±1.0396), Cd (0.06±0.040), Pb (0.3156±0.1175), Mn (9.4200±1.0383), Cr (1.3013±0.2739) and Zn (72.771±10.5672). Average mean concentration for all the metals in the study area was found to be higher than the recommended level which suggests that consumption of animals from this ecotomes are hazardous to human health and no single organ is completely safe for human consumption.

 

Key words: Bioaccumulation, Thryonomys swinderianus, cane rat, bush meat, heavy metals, wildlife consumption, animal toxicity.