Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences
Subscribe to JTEHS
Full Name*
Email Address*

Article Number - E7F98D563020


Vol.9(3), pp. 23-28 , March 2017
DOI: 10.5897/JTEHS2016.0378
ISSN: 2006-9820



Full Length Research Paper

Herbal teas heavy metal evaluation with renal function assessment in regular consumers in Benin



Allabi A. C.
  • Allabi A. C.
  • Laboratoire National des Stupéfiants et de Toxicologie (LNST), 01 BP 188 Cotonou, Benin.
  • Google Scholar
Adounkpe F.
  • Adounkpe F.
  • Laboratoire National des Stupéfiants et de Toxicologie (LNST), 01 BP 188 Cotonou, Benin.
  • Google Scholar
Vigan J.
  • Vigan J.
  • Unité de Néphrologie du CNHU-UKM, 01 BP 188 Cotonou, Benin.
  • Google Scholar
Gbegbe M.
  • Gbegbe M.
  • Unité de Pharmacologie, Faculté des Sciences de la Santé, Université d’Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 188 Cotonou, Benin.
  • Google Scholar
Topanou A.
  • Topanou A.
  • Laboratoire National des Stupéfiants et de Toxicologie (LNST), 01 BP 188 Cotonou, Benin.
  • Google Scholar
Fayomi B.
  • Fayomi B.
  • Unité de Médecine du Travail, 01 BP 188 Cotonou, Benin.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 27 December 2016  Accepted: 25 January 2017  Published: 31 March 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


Herbal teas are openly sold in markets and main streets of big cities like Cotonou in Benin. Most people treat themselves at low cost with wide variety of herbal plants with proven therapeutic properties. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the content of heavy metals in herbal teas sold daily in Cotonou. In addition, we would evaluate if this heavy metal content of herbal teas could affect the renal function of regular consumers. Therefore, herbal teas samples were collected from selected sellers at well-known places. Samples’ analyses were done by reverse anodic stripping voltammetry with the Metalyser HM 3000 coupled to PC 101 NT pump. Biological markers of kidney failure in blood and urine of regular consumers were also assessed. Renal creatinine clearance and albuminuria were measured, the ratio of micro-albuminuria/creatininuria was calculated, and then red and white blood cells were counted. The results indicate that 7.69 and 30.77% of the herbal teas samples displayed an abnormal high concentration in cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) concentration, respectively. Statistical significant difference was found between the analyzed herbal tea samples in regard to Cd and Pb content (P ˂ 0.01). No obvious biological sign of severe kidney damage has been noted among regular consumers using their blood and urine samples. Only 8.60% of them had clearances between 60 and 89 ml/min/1.73 m2 with mild kidney failure. This study indicates that some herbal teas contain toxic chemicals such as Cd and Pb over recommended limits of 3 and 10 µg/L, respectively. The regular consumption of these herbal teas could be health threatening for the population.

 

Key words: Herbal teas, heavy metals, environmental pollution, human renal function, anodic stripping voltammetry.

Adam S, Edorh P, Totin H (2010). Pesticides and heavy metals in the drinking water, soils and sediments of the cotton belt Gogounou, Kandi and Banikoara (Benin). Int. J. Biol. Sci. 4(4):1170-1179.

 

Baranowska I, Srogi K, Włochowicz A, Szczepanik K (2002). Determination of heavy metal contents in samples of medicinal herbs. Polish J. Environ. Stud. 11(5):467-471.

 
 

Baranowska I, Srogi K, Włochowicz A, Szczepanik K (2002). Determination of heavy metal contents in samples of medicinal herbs. Polish J. Environ. Stud. 11(5):467-471.

 
 

Bismuth C, Baud F, Conso F (2000). Clinic Toxicology. 5 editions. Paris: Flammarion. P 1092.

 
 

Esetlili BÇ, Pekcan T, Çobanoğlu Ö, Aydoğdu R, Turan S, Anaç D (2014). Essential plant nutrients and heavy metals concentrations of some medicinal and aromatic plants. Tarım Bilimleri Dergisi- J. Agric. Sci. 20(3): 239-247.

 
 

Friberg L, Lener J (1986). Handbook on the Toxicolgy of Metals, 2nd ed., Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands. pp. 446-461.

 
 

Hunt JR (2003). Bioavailability of iron, zinc, and other trace minerals from vegetarian diets. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 78(3): 633-639.

 
 

Hussain I, Riazullah, Khurram M, Ullah N, Baseer A, Khan FA, Khan N, Khattak MUR, Zahoor M, Khan J (2011). Heavy metals and inorganic constituents in medicinal plants of selected Districts of Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa Pakistan. Afr. J. Biotechnol.10(42): 8517-8522.
Crossref

 
 

Jabeen S, Tahir Shah M, Khan S, Qasim Hayat M (2010). Determination of major and trace elements in ten important folk therapeutic plants of Haripur Basin, Pakistan. J. Med. Plants Res. 4(7):559-566.

 
 

Jabeen S, Tahir Shah M, Khan S, Qasim Hayat M (2010). Determination of major and trace elements in ten important folk therapeutic plants of Haripur Basin, Pakistan. J. Med. Plants Res. 4(7):559-566.

 
 

Järup L (2003). Hazards of heavy metal contamination. Brit. Med. Bull. 68(1):167-182.
Crossref

 
 

Marcos A, Fischer A, Rea G, Hill SJ (1998). Preliminary study using trace element concentrations and a chemometrics approach to determine the geographical origin of tea. J. Anal. Atom. Spectrom. 13(6):521-525.
Crossref

 
 

Montcho S, Koudouvo K, Yehouenou A, Guedenon P, Koumolou L, Oke Sopoh M (2014). Sanitary Risks Connected to the Consumption of Infusion from Senna rotundifolia L. Contaminated with Lead and Cadmium in Cotonou. J. Toxicol. 1155:10-7.

 
 

Samali A, Rukaiyatu, Kirim A, Mustapha KB (2012). Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of some herbal teas commonly consumed in Nigeria. Afr. J. Pharm. Pharmacol.6(6):384-388.
Crossref

 
 

Stengel B (1996). Kidney disease from occupational toxic origin. Encycl. Méd. Chir. (Elsevier, Paris), Occupational Toxicology-Pathology, 15-530-H-10, Néphrology-Urology, 18-067-A-10. P 8.

 
 

Vigan J, Dovonou AC, Agboton BL, Hounsounou C, Zannou DM, Djrolo F (2013). Chronic renal failure at the departmental and university hospital Borgou (CHDU/B): frequency and clinic description. J. Biol. Soc. Clin. 18: 73-79.

 
 

World Health Organization (WHO) (1998). Determination of arsenic and heavy metals. Quality control methods for medicinal plant materials. Rep. Gen. pp. 61-63.

 
 

World Health Organization (WHO) (2011a). Cadmium in drinking-water. WHO/SDE/WSH/03.04/80/Rev/1. P 6.

 
 

World Health Organization (WHO) (2011b). Lead in drinking-water. WHO/SDE/WSH/03.04/09/Rev/1. P 14.

 
 

Zeggwagh A, Lahlou Y, Bousliman Y (2013). Survey on toxicological aspects of herbal medicine herbalist Used by non-Fez, Maroc. Pan. Afr. Med. J. 14:125-130.

 

 


APA Allabi, A. C., Adounkpe, F., Vigan, J., Gbegbe, M., Topanou, A., & Fayomi, B. (2017). Herbal teas heavy metal evaluation with renal function assessment in regular consumers in Benin. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences, 9(3), 23-28.
Chicago Allabi A. C., Adounkpe F., Vigan J., Gbegbe M., Topanou A., and Fayomi B.. "Herbal teas heavy metal evaluation with renal function assessment in regular consumers in Benin." Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences 9, no. 3 (2017): 23-28.
MLA Allabi A. C., et al. "Herbal teas heavy metal evaluation with renal function assessment in regular consumers in Benin." Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences 9.3 (2017): 23-28.
   
DOI 10.5897/JTEHS2016.0378
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/JTEHS/article-abstract/E7F98D563020

Subscription Form