Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health
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Article Number - 62A4D8D64295


Vol.9(6), pp. 105-109 , June 2017
DOI: 10.5897/JVMAH2017.0560
ISSN: 2141-2529



Full Length Research Paper

Prevalence and the associated risk factors of bovine trypanosomiasis in nyangatom pastoral woreda, Southern Nation and Nationalities People Region (SNNPR), Ethiopia



Sisay Tadele Kassa*
  • Sisay Tadele Kassa*
  • Gnangatom Livestock and Fishery Development Office, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Seblewongel Ayichew Megerssa
  • Seblewongel Ayichew Megerssa
  • School of Veterinary Medicine, Wolita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar







 Received: 10 February 2017  Accepted: 24 March 2017  Published: 30 June 2017

Copyright © 2017 Author(s) retain the copyright of this article.
This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0


A cross-sectional study was carried out in Nyangatom wereda of South Omo zone, Southern Nation and Nationalities People Region (SNNPR), Ethiopia with the general objectives to find out the prevalence of bovine trypanosomiasis and the risk factors associated with its prevalence from January to June 2015. To identify the protozoa blood samples (n =384) collected from the marginal ear vein of indigenous zebu cattle of more than one year age and both the sexes from three kebeles were examined by buffy coat technique, direct blood smear, thick blood smear and thin blood smear after staining. The overall prevalence of bovine trypanosomaisis was 26.3%. On peasant associations (PA’S) basis Lebere kebele has the highest prevalence 39(30.5%) followed by Shenkora kebele 34 (26.6%) and Ayipa kebele 28 (21.9%). Trypanosoma congolense is the most prevalent species (14.3%) followed by Trypanosoma vivax (5.70%) and Trypanosoma brucei (5.50%). A significant association was observed (P<0.05) between the disease positivity and age, sex and body condition score. The prevalence of trypanosomiasis was 16.20 and 31.50% in young and adult respectively. The prevalence 42.80 and 16.30 % in poor and good body condition score respectively. There was significant association between the risk factors and the species of trypanosomiasis (P<0.05). The result of the present study revealed that trypanosomiasis is the most important problem for animal production in the study area. Strategic control of bovine trypanosomiasis should be strengthened to improve livestock production and agricultural development in the area.

Key words: Bovine, buffy coat, Nyangatom, prevalence, trypanosomiasis.

Abbreviation:

ALC, Annual loss from liver condemnation; DACA, Disease Administration and Control Authority; FAO, Food and Agricultural Organization; HAT, Human African Trypanosomiasis; P, Prevalence rate of  the disease  at  the  study  area;  PA, Peasant Association; SNNPR, Southern Nation and Nationalities People Region; SOFEDD, South Omo zone Finance and Economy Development Department; STEP, Southern Tsetse Eradication Program.


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APA Kassa, S. T., & Megerssa, S. A. (2017). Prevalence and the associated risk factors of bovine trypanosomiasis in nyangatom pastoral woreda, Southern Nation and Nationalities People Region (SNNPR), Ethiopia. Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health, 9(6), 105-109.
Chicago Sisay Tadele Kassa and Seblewongel Ayichew Megerssa. "Prevalence and the associated risk factors of bovine trypanosomiasis in nyangatom pastoral woreda, Southern Nation and Nationalities People Region (SNNPR), Ethiopia." Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health 9, no. 6 (2017): 105-109.
MLA Sisay Tadele Kassa and Seblewongel Ayichew Megerssa. "Prevalence and the associated risk factors of bovine trypanosomiasis in nyangatom pastoral woreda, Southern Nation and Nationalities People Region (SNNPR), Ethiopia." Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health 9.6 (2017): 105-109.
   
DOI 10.5897/JVMAH2017.0560
URL http://academicjournals.org/journal/JVMAH/article-abstract/62A4D8D64295

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