African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6576

Full Length Research Paper

The status of livestock technologies and services in the Southern Maasai rangelands of Kenya

Simon P. W. Omondi
  • Simon P. W. Omondi
  • National Veterinary Research Centre, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Kenya
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John A. Kidali
  • John A. Kidali
  • National Veterinary Research Centre, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Kenya
  • Google Scholar
Irene Ogali
  • Irene Ogali
  • National Veterinary Research Centre, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Kenya
  • Google Scholar
John M. Mugambi
  • John M. Mugambi
  • National Veterinary Research Centre, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Kenya
  • Google Scholar
Jacob Letoire
  • Jacob Letoire
  • National Veterinary Research Centre, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Kenya
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  •  Received: 10 December 2012
  •  Accepted: 25 March 2014
  •  Published: 10 April 2014

Abstract

This study was carried out in Mashuru district, Kajiado County in the Southern Maasai rangelands of Kenya to assess the status of livestock technologies and services. Data was collected using a survey of 380 households, participatory stakeholder workshops, five focus groups with pastoralists, and key informant interviews. Analysis was done using frequency counts, percentages and chi square test. The findings of this study revealed that access to livestock technologies and services was hampered by institutional (77%), technological (12%), environmental (9%) and economic (2%) factors. Inadequate government staff, long distances to service providers and weak institutional linkages were the most common problems encountered by 27, 20 and 17% of pastoralists respectively. Technologies perceived to be important included: Availability of water and water harvesting technologies (52%); pastures (28%); vaccines and drugs (8%); dual purpose breeding stock for milk and meat production adapted to dry climatic conditions (4%); market infrastructure and information (4%); management skills (3%), and small equipment (1%). In view of problems encountered in accessing livestock services, Maasai pastoralists preferred the establishment of one-stop-shop centres stocked with priority inputs and technologies (P<0.05). The willingness of pastoralists (65%) to pay for this service should attract public-private partnerships to support livestock productivity in rangelands.

 

Key words: Livestock technologies and services, pastoralists, Maasai rangelands, multi-institutional linkages.