African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6638

Full Length Research Paper

Relationship between fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) infestation and the physicochemical changes in fresh fruits

Léo Rodrigo Ferreira Louzeiro
  • Léo Rodrigo Ferreira Louzeiro
  • Advanced Plant Protection and Animal Health Research Center, Instituto Biológico, CEP 13101-680 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
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Miguel Francisco de Souza-Filho
  • Miguel Francisco de Souza-Filho
  • Advanced Plant Protection and Animal Health Research Center, Instituto Biológico, CEP 13101-680 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Google Scholar
Adalton Raga
  • Adalton Raga
  • Advanced Plant Protection and Animal Health Research Center, Instituto Biológico, CEP 13101-680 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Google Scholar
Flávio Luís Schmidt
  • Flávio Luís Schmidt
  • Faculty of Food Engineering, Campinas State University, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 16 October 2019
  •  Accepted: 25 November 2019
  •  Published: 31 January 2020

Abstract

Infestation of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) causes physical and chemical changes in fresh fruit. Moreover, each species of fruit may react differently to the injuries caused by oviposition and larva feeding. In this study, we associated fruit fly infestation with physicochemical changes in five fruit species during six storage times. Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) infestation caused change in peel firmness (PEF), pulp firmness (PUF), pH, titratable acidity (TA) and total soluble solid (TSS) of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola L.). It led to changes in PEF, PUF, TA, TSS and weight loss (WL) of guava (Psidium guajava L.) and changes in PEF and TA of apple (Malus domestica Borkh). Infestation changed PEF, PUF, TA and WL in mango (Mangifera indica L.) and PEF, PUF, TA and TSS of tangerine (Citrus reticulata Blanco). C. capitata infestation caused significant physicochemical changes in fresh fruits. Our results demonstrated a marked loss of fresh fruit quality after four days of fruit fly infestation. This information can help assessment of fresh fruit quality for consumption and processing. We discuss how the relationship between fly/host fruit might influence physicochemical changes in fresh fruits and recommend applied studies to better understand these relationships.

Key words: Ceratitis capitata, fruit damage, quality assessment, postharvest fruit