African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6576

Full Length Research Paper

Balance of elements and tolerance of the Terminalia catappa L. to seawater salinity

Francisco Alves da Silva
  • Francisco Alves da Silva
  • Center of Science and Technology Agrofood (CCTA), Federal University of Campina Grande (UFCG), Pombal, PB, Brazil.
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Marcos Eric Barbosa Brito
  • Marcos Eric Barbosa Brito
  • Nucleus of Graduation in Education in Agrarian and Ground Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe, Campus do Sertão, Nossa Senhora da Glória, SE, Brazil.
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Pedro Dantas Fernandes
  • Pedro Dantas Fernandes
  • Academic Unit of Agricultural Engineering, UFCG, Rua Aprígio Veloso, 882, Campina Grande, PB, Brazil.
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Elisandra Ribeiro de Lima Pereira
  • Elisandra Ribeiro de Lima Pereira
  • Center for Social, Human and Agrarian Sciences, Federal University of Paraíba, Bananeiras, PB, Brazil.
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Camilo Alisson Simões de Farias
  • Camilo Alisson Simões de Farias
  • Center of Science and Technology Agrofood (CCTA), Federal University of Campina Grande (UFCG), Pombal, PB, Brazil.
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Marcos Barros de Medeiros
  • Marcos Barros de Medeiros
  • Center for Social, Human and Agrarian Sciences, Federal University of Paraíba, Bananeiras, PB, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 08 November 2016
  •  Accepted: 25 May 2017
  •  Published: 03 August 2017

Abstract

The Terminalia catappa L., popularly referred to as Indian almond, adapts to different soil and climatic conditions. It is a fast growing tree and has been widely used for ornamental and medicinal purposes. This plant might also be used as a carbon sequester in areas subject to soil and water salinity problems. This paper aims at studying the balance of salts among parts of the Indian almond tree under different salinity conditions in order to: (1) identify its tolerance mechanisms and (2) verify its applicability as a carbon sequestration species for areas with salinization problems. For this, the authors collected samples of leaves, almonds and almond shells from Terminalia catappa L. trees located in eight sites of Brazil, all exposed to four different seawater salinity conditions: (1) plants located around 120 km from sea breeze (2) plants under sea breeze; and plants in seashore (3) without and (4) with direct exposure of roots to seawater. For each site, we collected four samples. As a result, the proposal was set to as an exploratory research composed of eight sites for the collection of three organs of the Indian almond tree (8×3) with four repetitions. Altogether, micronutrients and macronutrients contents were determined for 96 parcels. The exposure to seawater salinity did not change the macronutrient contents in the almonds, what is a protective mechanism of the Indian almond tree. Indian almond trees may be used to reforest areas with salinization problems. In order to protect itself from seawater salinity, the Indian almond tree compartmentalizes sodium salts in the pericarp of the fruit.

Key words: Nutritional balance, natural stress, Indian almond tree.