African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6183

Full Length Research Paper

Mango (Mangifera indica L.) production practices and constraints in major production regions of Ethiopia

Tewodros B. Neguse
  • Tewodros B. Neguse
  • School of Plant Sciences, Haramaya University, Haramaya, Ethiopia.
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Fredah K. R. Wanzala
  • Fredah K. R. Wanzala
  • Department of Horticulture, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya.
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Wassu M. Ali
  • Wassu M. Ali
  • School of Plant Sciences, Haramaya University, Haramaya, Ethiopia.
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Willis O. Owino
  • Willis O. Owino
  • Department of Food Science and Technology, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya.
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Githiri S. Mwangi
  • Githiri S. Mwangi
  • Department of Horticulture, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya.
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  •  Received: 05 October 2018
  •  Accepted: 05 December 2018
  •  Published: 24 January 2019

Abstract

Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is the second among fruit crops in Ethiopia in its production coverage and economical importance. However, compared to the countries’ potential, it is at the infant stage. This study was conducted to identify the main mango cultivars, production practices and constraints in east and western Ethiopia in 2016. Study areas were selected purposively based on their extensive mango production. Thirty-one cultivars of unknown origin were identified based on farmers’ characterization criteria. The majority of the farmers were found not to apply fertilizers (63.7%), supplementary irrigation (87.6%), nor prune their mangos (50%). About 50% of growers revealed fruit yield of 100-200 kg/tree and harvest fully ripe. Packaging and transportation of mangos were entirely below the standard. Availability of agricultural inputs such as fertilizers and pesticides, pest, knowledge and skill gap, and availability of improved varieties were the major constraints. Assessment of similarities in terms of farming system, mango production practices, harvest, post-harvest handling, marketing, and their constraints indicated that 76.9% of growers were similar. Therefore, improvement of the pre and post-production practices, utilization and/or conservation of the identified cultivars, and addressing the constraints will be crucial to improving the mango sector in Ethiopia.

Key words: Interview, mango cultivars, tropical fruit, biodiversity.