African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6668

Full Length Research Paper

Technology transfer and anthropotechnology: An analysis of the sugarcane harvesting in Australia and Brazil

Lidiane Regina Narimoto
  • Lidiane Regina Narimoto
  • Production Engineering Department, Federal University of São Carlos, city of São Carlos, São Paulo State, Brazil.
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Joao Alberto Camarotto
  • Joao Alberto Camarotto
  • Production Engineering Department, Federal University of São Carlos, city of São Carlos, São Paulo State, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 20 January 2017
  •  Accepted: 18 May 2017
  •  Published: 02 August 2018

Abstract

The present paper conducts a comparative analysis of the operation of sugarcane harvesting machines in their original place of design (Australia) and in a recipient country of this technology (Brazil). The method comprised Ergonomic Work Analysis (EWA) and the assumptions of anthropotechnology proposed by Wisner. The results achieved depict the similarities and differences between the two countries regarding: (a) the work organization and harvesting practices, (b) the harvesting strategies of the teams, and (c) the design modifications performed in the harvesting machines. The differences of how the machines were operated in both countries were identified, such as sloping grounds and amount of working hours, which lead to structural modifications in Brazilian machines. Thus, the design-in-use to adapt a technology to local conditions is crucial when there is inadequate technology transfer. The anthropotechnological approach proved to be relevant to understand all the broader factors causing difficulties in a technology transfer process.

Key words: Sugar cane harvester, harvesting machine, design-in-use, work organization, ergonomics.