African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6576

Growth and development of gabiroba [Campomanesia adamantium (Cambess.) O. Berg] fruits

Marilia Assis dos Santos
  • Marilia Assis dos Santos
  • Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology ? Rio Verde Campus, Rodovia Sul Goiana, km 01, Zona Rural, CEP 75.901-970, Caixa Postal 66, Goias, Brasil.
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Clarice Aparecida Megguer
  • Clarice Aparecida Megguer
  • Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology ? Rio Verde Campus, Rodovia Sul Goiana, km 01, Zona Rural, CEP 75.901-970, Caixa Postal 66, Goias, Brasil.
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Alan Carlos Costa
  • Alan Carlos Costa
  • Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology ? Rio Verde Campus, Rodovia Sul Goiana, km 01, Zona Rural, CEP 75.901-970, Caixa Postal 66, Goias, Brasil.
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Julien da Silva Lima
  • Julien da Silva Lima
  • Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology ? Rio Verde Campus, Rodovia Sul Goiana, km 01, Zona Rural, CEP 75.901-970, Caixa Postal 66, Goias, Brasil.
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  •  Received: 17 January 2014
  •  Accepted: 01 April 2015
  •  Published: 02 April 2015

Abstract

The Brazilian Savanna is one of the largest and richest tropical savannas in the world, possessing substantial biodiversity. However, little information is available about fruit development in Brazilian Savanna bushy species. Thus, the objective of this study was to physically and physico-chemically characterize the growth and development of gabiroba fruits, Campomanesia adamantium (Cambess.) O. Berg. After harvest, the fruits were analysed for acidity, density, volume, longitudinal diameter, cross-sectional diameter, fresh mass, dry mass, soluble solids, respiratory rate, firmness and soluble solids/acidity ratio. The data were then submitted to descriptive analyses. The developmental period of the gabiroba fruit comprised nine weeks (63 days) from the time of fruit set. The mass-accumulation curve of the gabiroba fruit resembled a double-sigmoidal pattern. The respiration rate of the fruit was low, and the climacteric phase occurred between 21 and 28 days after fruit set. Based on the analyzed attributes, authors conclude that gabiroba fruit can be harvested beginning 35 days after fruit set and extending to 56 days after fruit set. The optimum time for consumption occurs 49 days after fruit set, when fruit size, mass, SS/TA ratio and soluble solids reach their peak values, and acidity and firmness are reduced.

 

Key words: Cerrado, harvest, growth curve, fruit trees.