African Journal of
Biotechnology

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Biotechnol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1684-5315
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJB
  • Start Year: 2002
  • Published Articles: 12095

Review

Prospects of genetic modified maize crop in Africa

Andekelile Mwamahonje
  • Andekelile Mwamahonje
  • Department of Plant breeding and Biotechnology, Makutupora Agricultural Research Institute, Dodoma, Tanzania.
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Leon Mrosso
  • Leon Mrosso
  • Department of Plant breeding and Biotechnology, Makutupora Agricultural Research Institute, Dodoma, Tanzania.
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  •  Received: 11 November 2015
  •  Accepted: 11 March 2016
  •  Published: 13 April 2016

Abstract

Genetic modified maize crop increases annually as a result of food insecurity and limited land caused by rapid population increase of over seven billion in the world. Scientists have been playing their role to address this food insecurity problem. The use of genetically modified (GM) maize crop to feed people is one of the proposed ways, because it yields more compared to the conventional varieties. However, there are several contradictions which hinder the adoption of this new technology. Some studies have shown that GM maize is risky to human health, animals and not friendly to environmental conservation, which may lead to the death of other bio-diversities. Generally, other studies have supported the consumption of GM maize. However, after being approved by the scientist in the countries concerned, the GM maize varieties which seem to be hazardous to human health must be prohibited in research centres so as to avoid transportation to other countries. Regarding the new technology of GM maize, the conventional method of breeding is still important to keep maize seeds available in the gene bank. Therefore, researchers should consider this for further research issues on maize improvement.

Key words: Bacillus thuringensis-maize, Bacillus thuringensis protein, conventional breeding, environment, food crisis, genetic modified maize, genetic modified organism, health risk, landraces.

Abbreviation

Bt, Bacillus thuringensis; DDT, dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane; EFSA, European Food Safety Authority; EPA, Environmental Protection Agency; EU, European Union; GMO, genetic modified organism; Ht, herbicide tolerant; MRL, maximum residue levels; R, roundup; USDA, United States Department of Agriculture