African Journal of
Food Science

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Food Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0794
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJFS
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 896

Full Length Research Paper

Effect of processing on the quality of flour, abacha slices and its flour derived from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) TMS 97/4779

Ekwu, F. C.*
  • Ekwu, F. C.*
  • Department of Food Science and Technology, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.
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Ngoddy, P. O.
  • Ngoddy, P. O.
  • Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria.
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Uvere, P. O.
  • Uvere, P. O.
  • Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 28 February 2014
  •  Accepted: 19 September 2014
  •  Published: 30 September 2014

Abstract

This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of processing methods on the quality of abacha slices. Abacha slices were produced from cassava (TMS 97/4779) roots by four different methods. The abacha processing methods investigated were of different peeling, boiling, slicing and soaking methods. Also, raw cassava flour, which was peeled, sliced and dried (PSD) was produced. The sensory properties and yield of abacha, the chemical and physical properties of the flour from the dried abacha and raw cassava flour were determined. The sensory properties of the fresh abacha were evaluated which showed that boiled, peeled and sliced sample (BPS) was most preferred. The yield of the abacha ranged from 29.17-39.13%. Significant differences (p<0.05) were observed in the proximate composition of the samples. The processing methods significantly affected the swelling index and water absorption capacity of the abacha flour. PSD sample showed the highest value in swelling index and water absorption capacity. The cyanide content, which ranged from 4.20-7.20 mg/kg, was below the recommended safety level of 10 mg/kg HCN. The processing methods significantly (p<0.05) affected the pasting properties of the abacha flour except peak viscosity and peak time.

 

Key words: Cassava, peeling, boiling, slicing, soaking, hydrogen cyanide.