African Journal of
Microbiology Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Microbiol. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0808
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJMR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 4998

Full Length Research Paper

Assessment of bacteriological quality of water sources from an agrarian settlement in South-East Nigeria

Emmanuel lkechukwu Nnamonu
  • Emmanuel lkechukwu Nnamonu
  • Department of Biology, Federal College of Education, Eha-Amufu, Enugu State, Nigeria
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Felix Joel Ugwu
  • Felix Joel Ugwu
  • Department of Biology, Federal College of Education, Eha-Amufu, Enugu State, Nigeria
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Obiageli Constance Ejilibe
  • Obiageli Constance Ejilibe
  • Department of Biology, Federal College of Education, Eha-Amufu, Enugu State, Nigeria
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Ogonna Christiana Ani
  • Ogonna Christiana Ani
  • Department of Applied Biology, Ebonyi State University Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.
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Paul Emenike Martins
  • Paul Emenike Martins
  • Environmental Pollution Control, Faculty of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield Campus, Southampton, Hampshire, SO17 1BJ, United Kingdom.
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Samuel Osemedua Onyeidu
  • Samuel Osemedua Onyeidu
  • Department of Information and Communication Technology, ICT University Yaounde, Cameroon.
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Blessing Uchechukwu Onyeidu
  • Blessing Uchechukwu Onyeidu
  • Department of Home Economics, Federal College of Education, Eha-Amufu, Enugu State, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 11 October 2019
  •  Accepted: 14 November 2019
  •  Published: 31 December 2019

Abstract

This study assessed the bacteriological quality of groundwater, rainwater and surface water sourced from an agrarian settlement in South-eastern Nigeria. Agamede, Amede, Ihenyi, Mgbuji and Umuhu communities in Eha-Amufu served as sampling locations. Samples were sourced from River Ebenyi, hand-dug wells and rooftop harvested rainwater. Bacterial isolation, identification and enumeration followed standard methods. Coliform counts were above WHO permissible standard except groundwater sourced at Mgbuji. Whereas a significant difference occurred in the means of coliform counts of lactose-fermenters (LF) of groundwater and rainwater, no significant difference occurred among non-lactose fermenters (NLF) across all locations. There was no significant difference between the mean coliform colony count of LF and NLF across surface water in different locations. Bayesian Paired Samples T-Test and Post-Hoc showed no significant difference in the total colony count of LF and NLF coliforms and means of total colony count between and within water sources across stations. However, the mean total coliform count in rainwater was the highest. Our results demonstrate that water sources from the agrarian settlements were contaminated by coliforms whilst settlers and others that consume them via drinking and domestic purposes are vulnerable, especially the aged, children and immunocompromised.  

 

Key words: Water quality, bacteriology, agrarian settlement, coliform.