African Journal of
Pharmacy and Pharmacology

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Pharm. Pharmacol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0816
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPP
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 2207

Review

Development of Pharmacy Education in Kenya Universities to date

Ikoni J. Ogaji
  • Ikoni J. Ogaji
  • Department of Pharmacy and Alternative and Complementary Medicine, School of Medicine, Kenyatta University, P O Box 43844-00100, Nairobi, Kenya.
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Titus M. Kahiga
  • Titus M. Kahiga
  • Department of Pharmacy and Alternative and Complementary Medicine, School of Medicine, Kenyatta University, P O Box 43844-00100, Nairobi, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar
Onesmus W. Gachuno
  • Onesmus W. Gachuno
  • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nairobi, P O Box 30197-00100, Nairobi, Kenya
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Julius W. Mwangi
  • Julius W. Mwangi
  • epartment of Pharmacology and Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi, P O Box 30197-00100, Nairobi, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 11 July 2015
  •  Accepted: 04 November 2015
  •  Published: 15 May 2016

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to examine the development of pharmacy education in Kenya since independence. Websites of the Pharmacy and Poison Board of Kenya and the Commission for University Education as well as those of the universities offering pharmacy education were used to obtain information such as the framework for establishment of programmes in higher institutions, curriculum, regulation of pharmacy practice among others. From a single institution in the 1970s, six universities that are evenly divided between government and private ownerships now offer Bachelor of Pharmacy programs in Kenya. Irrespective of the ownership the requirement for the establishment of programs in Kenya universities is centrally formulated and established. Pharmacy education is regulated by both the Commission for University Education and Pharmacy and Poisons Board. Adequate and well trained, motivated and productive workforce is required for effective teaching and learning and thus the key elements for local and international competence of the graduates. The proliferation of pharmacy education institutions requires a greater and continuous collaboration amongst the regulators and the stakeholders to ensure that pharmacy graduates from these newly established schools are adequately trained and equipped to meet the ever changing healthcare needs of the populace.

 

Key words: University, pharmacy education, healthcare, competence, human resource, Kenya.