African Journal of
Plant Science

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Plant Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0824
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPS
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 683

Full Length Research Paper

Survey of ethno-veterinary medicinal plants at selected Horro Gudurru Districts, Western Ethiopia

Tadesse Birhanu*
  • Tadesse Birhanu*
  • School of Veterinary Medicine, Collage of Medical and Health Science, Wollega University, P. O. Box 395, Nekemte, Ethiopia.
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Dereje Abera
  • Dereje Abera
  • School of Veterinary Medicine, Collage of Medical and Health Science, Wollega University, P. O. Box 395, Nekemte, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 23 August 2014
  •  Accepted: 12 February 2015
  •  Published: 31 March 2015

Abstract

Plant remedies are still the most important in therapeutics of treat livestock diseases, though large knowledge of ethno medicinal plants is declining to deterioration due to the oral passage of herbal heritage verbally. The objective of the study was to identify and document ethno-veterinary medicinal plants. The study was carried out from January to July 2014 at selected Horro Gudurru districts of western Ethiopia. The study sites were selected purposefully based on the recommendations of elders and local authorities. Ethno-botanical data were collected using semi-structured interviews, field observations and group discussion. About 51 study participants were involved in this study during the study period. A total of 25 ethno-veterinary medicinal plant species belonging to 19 families were documented with details on their local name, family, habitat, their traditional preparation and mode of application. Solanaceae families constituted the highest proportion (16%) followed by Euphorbiaceae (12%). The informants reported that there were 14 known livestock diseases which are treated by traditional healers. Herbs (44%) were the most widely used followed by shrubs (32%). Oral route of administration (76%) was the most commonly used followed by topical (24%). About 78.4% of the plant taxa were available every time. Agricultural expansion (43.3%) has been found to be the first main threat followed by deforestation (21.2%). The study revealed that the traditional healers and some livestock owners had knowledge of medicinal plants used to treat livestock diseases. Hence, further research should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and possible toxicity of the plants in the study area.

 

Key words: Ethno-veterinary, disease, Horro Guduru Wollega, medicinal plants, livestock.