International Journal of
Livestock Production

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Livest. Prod.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2448
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJLP
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 227

Full Length Research Paper

Production practices of local pig farmers in Ghana

Aryee Sethlina Naa Dodua
  • Aryee Sethlina Naa Dodua
  • Department of Pathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
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Osei-Amponsah Richard
  • Osei-Amponsah Richard
  • Department of Pathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
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Adjei Owusu Dennis
  • Adjei Owusu Dennis
  • Department of Animal Science, College of Basic and Applied Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon-Accra, Ghana. 3Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Science, University of Melbourne, Australia.
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Ahunu Benjamin Kwadjo
  • Ahunu Benjamin Kwadjo
  • Department of Animal Science, College of Basic and Applied Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon-Accra, Ghana. 3Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Science, University of Melbourne, Australia.
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Skinner Benjamin Matthew
  • Skinner Benjamin Matthew
  • Department of Pathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
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Sargent Carole Anne
  • Sargent Carole Anne
  • Department of Pathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
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  •  Received: 20 February 2019
  •  Accepted: 24 April 2019
  •  Published: 30 June 2019

Abstract

Local pig production is of economic, nutritional and socio-cultural importance to livelihoods in Ghana. Data was collected from 176 local pig farmers in four regions of Ghana using pretested structured questionnaire. Majority of the farmers interviewed were males over 30 years and kept crossbred pigs (64%) with income (95%) as their main motivation. In terms of housing of pigs, most farmers use sheds (39%), about a third had permanent structures (34%), whilst the rest (22%) use stalls with a few keeping their animals in their yards (2%) or having no housing facility (2%) at all. Growth rate of pigs was a relatively important trait (49%) for the farmers compared to aesthetic traits like coat colour or ear orientation. Majority of the farmers (90%) acquired their breeding stock from family, friends and the open market with only 10% acquiring breeding stock from government breeding stations. Local pig production in the study area was characterised as semi-intensive with significant opportunities for stakeholders to make interventions for improvement through provision of improved breeds, housing, feeding and veterinary care.

Key words: Food security, farmer education, pig production, sustainable breeding programmes.