ISABB Journal of
Food and Agricultural Sciences

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF AFRICAN BIOTECHNOLOGISTS AND BIOSCIENTISTS
  • Abbreviation: ISABB. J. Food and Agric. Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1937-3244
  • DOI: 10.5897/ISABB-JFAS
  • Start Year: 2011
  • Published Articles: 37

Full Length Research Paper

Local perception, effect and coping mechanism of food aid and determinants of dependency syndrome: The case of Raya Azebo Woreda, Southern Tigray, Ethiopia

Tewedaj Kahsay
  • Tewedaj Kahsay
  • Department of Economics, Aksum University, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Abebe Lemma
  • Abebe Lemma
  • Department of Economics, Aksum University, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Zinabu Marsie
  • Zinabu Marsie
  • Department of Soil Resources and Watershed Management, Aksum University, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 06 October 2020
  •  Accepted: 22 December 2020
  •  Published: 28 February 2021

Abstract

The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of local level perceptions, socio-economic effects and coping mechanisms of food aid and determinants of dependency syndrome of HHs in Raya Azebo Woreda. Questionnaires, interviews, and FGD data collection tools were employed. To identify determinant factors of dependency syndrome, a probit model has been employed. The probit regression result showed that four out of eleven explanatory variables were found to be statistically significant. Except market prices of food aid item that is found positively associated, the remaining three explanatory variables were negatively associated with households' perception of food aid and dependence syndrome. Thus, the research result indicates that the perception of food aid dependency syndrome is not reflected in the daily practices of food aid beneficiaries. It also reveals that food aid has not socially affected the households, and the majority of respondents were also reported not to have experienced any tangible economic benefits despite being supported for many years. Participants and key informants were reported to have adopted at least nine (9) different coping mechanisms by household head beneficiaries.

 

Key words:  Food aid, dependency syndrome, local perception, Probit model.