Journal of
Agricultural Extension and Rural Development

  • Abbreviation: J. Agric. Ext. Rural Dev
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2170
  • DOI: 10.5897/JAERD
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 489

Full Length Research Paper

Adoption levels of agroforestry tree types and practices by smallholders in the semi-arid areas of Kenya: A case of Makueni County

Maluki J. M.
  • Maluki J. M.
  • Department of Dryland Agriculture, South Eastern Kenya University, P. O. Box 170 - 90200 Kitui, Kenya.
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Kimiti J. M.
  • Kimiti J. M.
  • Department of Forestry and Land Resource Management, South Eastern Kenya University, P. O. Box 170 – 90200 Kitui, Kenya.
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Nguluu S.
  • Nguluu S.
  • Department of Dryland Agriculture, South Eastern Kenya University, P. O. Box 170 - 90200 Kitui, Kenya.
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Musyoki J. K.*
  • Musyoki J. K.*
  • Kenya Forestry Research Institute, P.O Box 87-90137Kibwezi, Kenya.
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  •  Accepted: 18 April 2016
  •  Published: 30 September 2016

Abstract

A survey targeting smallholder households was carried out in Mumbuni and Ndovoini sub-locations in the semi arid Makueni County, Kenya, to identify agroforestry types and practices and their level of adoption and socio-economic factors influencing adoption of agroforestry. The study involved a survey of 234 households using a structured questionnaire. The collected data was subjected to descriptive statistical analysis and binary logistic regression model. Results obtained revealed that more than 90% of the households practised agroforestry. It was also observed that significantly (P<0.01) more agroforestry trees in overall were planted at Mumbuni (40 trees/acre) than at Ndovoini (9 trees/acre). Agroforestry annually contributed 41 and 17% of farm-based income in Mumbuni and Ndovoini, respectively. Adoption of agroforestry was significantly influenced by the size of the household, mode of acquisition of land, security of land tenure, size of landholding, gender and the level of education of the head household. Adoption of sustainable agroforestry practices was low in both sites. There were 50 to 58% of households with fruit trees dispersed on crop land; the other practices on fruits were poorly being carried out (<20%). The highest practices on forest wood trees were homestead planting (Mumbuni 40.2% and Ndovoini 70.1%); the rest were poorly adopted (<25%). Agroforestry practices on fodder were least adopted (<16%).

Key words: Agroforestry, agroforestry practices, Makueni County, semi arid lands, socio-economic factors, adoption of agroforestry.