Journal of
Agricultural Extension and Rural Development

  • Abbreviation: J. Agric. Ext. Rural Dev
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2170
  • DOI: 10.5897/JAERD
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 455

Full Length Research Paper

Farmers’ perception towards climate change and their adaptation measures in Dire Dawa Administration, Eastern Ethiopia

Alem Kidanu
  • Alem Kidanu
  • College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
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Kibebew Kibret
  • Kibebew Kibret
  • College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
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Jemma Hajji
  • Jemma Hajji
  • College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
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Muktar Mohammed
  • Muktar Mohammed
  • College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
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Yosef Ameha
  • Yosef Ameha
  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, P. O. Box, 2003, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 30 June 2016
  •  Accepted: 01 August 2016
  •  Published: 31 December 2016

Abstract

This study assessed farmers’ perception and adaptation options to climate change in six kebeles selected from different agro-ecological zones of Dire Dawa Administration, eastern Ethiopia. Data for the study were collected from 171 respondents selected through multi-stage sampling technique. Descriptive statistics were employed to assess climate change perception differentials among gender, social groups and institutional settings, while multinomial logit model (MNL) was used to identify factors influencing households’ climate change adaptation options. The results revealed an increment in annual (0.2-1.1°C/decade) and seasonal (0.5-1.4°C/decade) temperatures at all stations and the rate of an increment was found to be higher in the highland areas. Similarly, 76.0 and 81.9% of the interviewed farmers were aware of the change in annual and seasonal temperature respectively and their perception appears to be in accordance with the statistical record of these areas. Whereas, both the annual and seasonal precipitations were found to have no trend, except for one station at Dire Dawa where only annual and summer precipitations were found to have an increasing trend and Kulubi where a winter precipitation was found to have a decreasing trend. Farmers’ perception on the patterns of annual and meher precipitations were in line with the observed data at two stations (Kulubi and Dengego). On the other hand, the surveyed farm households in the study area perceived at least one aspect of climate change primarily through their life experience. The majority of farmers (81.87%) adapted to climate change stresses using the adaptation strategies such as soil and water conservation with or without agronomic practices like change in cropping time; crop type and variety and crop diversification. Results of the multinomial logit model showed that farm size, level of education of household head, agro-ecology, livestock owned, farm income and credit service significantly and positively influences one or a combination of climate change adaptation strategies identified by farmers. On the other hand, gender, age of the household head and non-farm income were found to influence the adaptation strategies pursued by farmers negatively and significantly. Therefore, an effort that enhances farmers’ education, farm and livestock productivity, and credit services in accordance with different agro-ecologies so as to create the capacity to adapt to climate induced stresses remain an important strategy that policy makers at all levels of the administration should consider. In addition, sex, age and non-farm income of the household should also be sought critically.  
 
Key words: Climate change, adaptation, perception, determinants, multinomial logit model.