Journal of
AIDS and HIV Research

  • Abbreviation: J. AIDS HIV Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2359
  • DOI: 10.5897/JAHR
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 283

Full Length Research Paper

Prevalence and predictors of willingness to care for relatives living with HIV/AIDS: Evidence from women of reproductive age in Nigeria

A. S. Adebowale
  • A. S. Adebowale
  • Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
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O. B. Yusuf
  • O. B. Yusuf
  • Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
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B. O. Ogunbiyi
  • B. O. Ogunbiyi
  • Population Action International, Washington DC, United States of America.
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P. I. Omoniyi
  • P. I. Omoniyi
  • Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
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  •  Accepted: 24 December 2012
  •  Published: 28 February 2013

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) constitutes threat to human life. Escalating number of HIV/AIDS cases in Nigeria demands for more relatives that will provide care for People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Receiving care from relatives provides PLWHA the strength to confront life.  Information on Willingness to Provide Care (WPC) for PLWHA is insufficient in Nigeria; hence, this study. This cross-sectional design study utilized Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, 2008 dataset with focus on women of age 15 to 49 (n=27, 195). The dependent variable was WPC for Relatives Living with HIV/AIDS (RLWHA). Data was analysed using Chi-square and logistic regression models (α=5.0%). Mean age of the women was 28.79±9.4 years and the prevalence of WPC for RLWHA was 65.4% with urban women (70.8%) more WPC for RLWHA than their counterparts in the rural areas (61.9%) (p<0.0001). The percentage of women WPC for RLWHA increases with increasing level of education (p<0.0001). The identified predictors of WPC for RLWHA were the age, residence, religion, region, education, knowing someone who had died of HIV/AIDS, knowing someone denied of health services because of AIDS and believing that PLWHA should be ashamed of themselves. Majority of women in Nigeria were WPC for RLWHA. However, programmes that can improve WPC for RLWHA in Nigeria are indispensable.

 

Key words: Willingness to provide care, people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), Nigeria.