Journal of
Development and Agricultural Economics

  • Abbreviation: J. Dev. Agric. Econ.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9774
  • DOI: 10.5897/JDAE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 443

Full Length Research Paper

Drivers and socioeconomic factors influencing individual and household adaptation to climate change: A case study of residents of Leeds, UK

Eberechukwu J. Ihemezie
  • Eberechukwu J. Ihemezie
  • Department of Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.
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Cynthia N. Onunka
  • Cynthia N. Onunka
  • Department of Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Amaka P. Nnaji
  • Amaka P. Nnaji
  • Department of Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 29 April 2018
  •  Accepted: 09 July 2018
  •  Published: 30 September 2018

Abstract

The dynamic nature of human adaptation and coping strategies to climate change continues to arouse the interest of environmental researchers. This study contributed to this growing area of research by examining the drivers and some socioeconomic factors influencing individual and household adaptation to climate change. Data were collected through household surveys and in-depth interviews. Descriptive statistics, binomial logistic regression, multiple regression analysis, and content/discourse analysis were employed to analyse data collected. The study result shows that the majority of the respondents adopt low cost and low skill coping responses against cold spell. The comfort of the household was found to be the key driver of adaptation to cold spell. Meanwhile, government support and having previous experience of flooding increases the chances of households adopting flood defense measures. The result further shows that house type (p<0.01), house ownership (p<0.01), and income (p<0.05) were significant factors affecting the level of adaptation strategies adopted. Age, gender, and education were found not to be significant in affecting the level of adaptation strategies adopted. The study recommended that government support as well as improvement in some socioeconomic factors like income level and educational level will increase individual and household resilience against climate change.

Key words: Climate change, adaptation drivers, protection motivation, coping responses, individual and household, UK.